97 Photos

AMAZON, NOT-DOT.COM

Impressions of Iquitos, including Belen, and reflections on a week-long boat trip on Amazonian rivers.

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Spices, Belen market
Author
Norma Norland
We have been back from the Amazon for several weeks now. There has been plenty of time to readjust to the cool, the early frosts, the lingering sunsets. And the wind. There isn't much wind in the …
Belen market
Author
Norma Norland
And then there were the river dolphins, gray ones and pink, and many, many birds. By category I can name birds that were identified to us: kingfishers, wading birds, vultures, hawks and kites, …
Amazonian logging, ready for shipment
Author
Norma Norland
Most of the people who live along the rivers are subsistence farmers, growing small patches of corn, yucca, papaya, melons, and sometimes rice. Most of their protein comes from fish. In the markets …
Waterfront, Iquitos
Author
Norma Norland
Early explorers of the region emerged from the jungle skinny, unkempt and often unhinged. Many of them starved: In ''The Lost City of Z'' David Grann describes several expeditions undertaken in …
In Iquitos
Author
Norma Norland
On our elegant ship, where we spent a week exploring the Amazon and several other rivers, memorably the Pacaya in the pristine Pacaya-Samiria Reserve, we were coddled with nightly tasting menus of …
Plaza des Armes, Iquitos
Author
Norma Norland
Iquitos is bustling, heterogeneous, grubby, rakish. In short, interesting. Since there are no roads that lead anywhere (with the single exception of a 70 mile-long road that took 30 years to build …
Street art, Iquitos
Author
Norma Norland
During the wet season the water rises some 20 or more feet around Iquitos, but last year was freakish, and in March the water kept on rising and rising, flooding all the lower ground of Iquitos …
Casa Morey, an ex-rubber baron's home, our hotel in Iquitos
Author
Norma Norland
It's impossible to avoid talking of numbers when describing the Amazon: it's the largest drainage basin in the world (some 40% of South America), with tributaries pouring in from Venezuela, Ecuador, …
Just a baby anaconda!
Author
Norma Norland
Three degrees south of the equator, in Peru. Really far from Vermont. In many ways. It's the largest city in the world that has no roads leading in or out. The only ways to get here are by plane …

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