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Table Mountain and Cape Town Harbour, South Africa

Cape Town-Mahe

Example 19 Day Cruise aboard Silver Cloud
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Sail from Cape Town's rugged beaches to the tranquil shores of Mahe. Beginning in Cape Town, travel north to Port Elizabeth, East London, Durban, and Richards Bay - all of which are rich in traditional Zulu and Xhosa culture. Two days at sea bring you to Mozambique Island and its kaleidoscope of civilizations. Continue your adventure and exploration with a visit to the scented islands of Comoros and Madagascar. Two days on Aldabra, renowned for its enormous population of gigantic tortoises, alters your perception of an island atoll.
Sunset over Century City, CapetownCape Town viewCape of Good HopeDurban waterfrontRelax on the beaches of MadagascarTable Mountain and Cape Town Harbour, South Africa
Highlights
  • Explore the endless, staggeringly blue coastline of Table Mountain, Cape Town
  • Discover Port Elizabeth's beaches, rolling sand dunes, artwork, and cuisine.
  • Explore the bustling harbor town of Richards Bay
  • Snorkel with Sea turtles, rays, and dolphins in the clear, azure waters of Nosy Komba
Activity Level: Relaxed
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Full Itinerary

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Day 1: Cape Town| Embark

Sprawling across the endless, staggeringly blue coastline, and watched over by the iconic plane of Table Mountain, Cape Town is, without doubt, one of the world’s most beautiful cities. A blend of spectacular mountain scenery, multiculturalism, and relaxed ocean charm awaits in the Mother City, where you can venture out to rolling vineyards, dine in laid-back sea suburbs, or spend days exploring the cool urban culture. Cape Town’s natural splendor fully reveals itself as the cable car rears sharply to the top of Table Mountain. From the summit, 3,500 feet above sea level, you can let the scale of the panoramic vistas of the city rolling down towards the ocean wash over you. Other heavenly perspective waits at the top of Lion's Head’s tapering peak. A sharp hike and an early start are required, but the views of the morning sun painting Table Mountain honey-gold are some of Cape Town’s finest. Cape Town’s glorious sunshine and inviting blue rollers can be a little deceiving - these oceans are anything but warm at times, with nothing between the peninsula’s end and Antarctica’s icy chill. This cool water has upsides though, bringing a colony of adorably cute African penguins to Boulders Beach. Boarded walkways offer the perfect vantage point to see the cute creatures dipping into the sea and lounging in the sun. Nearby, journey to the end of Africa at the Cape of Good Hope, where you can stand at the bottom of this mighty continent, watching out over the merging waves of the Atlantic and Indian Oceans. Cape Town’s beauty is counterpointed by the ominous island form, which sits four miles offshore from the bustling restaurants and lazy seals of the lively V&A Waterfront. A living history lesson, you can sail in the ships that transported prisoners out to Robben Island, before a former prisoner tells of the traumas of life on this offshore prison. Your guide will show you the cramped cells, and render Mandela’s long walk to freedom in heartbreaking, visceral clarity.
 

Day 2: At sea

  • Ship
  • 1 Breakfast, 1 Lunch, 1 Dinner
Days at sea are the perfect opportunity to relax, unwind and catch up with what you’ve been meaning to do. So whether that is going to the gym, visiting the spa, whale watching, catching up on your reading, or simply topping up your tan, these blue sea days are the perfect balance to busy days spent exploring the shoreside.
 

Day 3: Port Elizabeth

  • Ship
  • 1 Breakfast, 1 Lunch, 1 Dinner
Port Elizabeth or PE is an uncut gem of a destination. Loved by wealthy South African families as a holiday destination, it is a city has of faces. One: a natural haven with unspoiled beaches, rolling sand dunes, and the warm Indian Ocean lapping at your feet, and two: a post-industrial migrant city with a rich heritage. PE is also called Nelson Mandela Bay, and there is much here that celebrates him – starting with Route 67, a collection of 67 artworks honoring the 67 years that Mandela dedicated to achieving South Africa’s freedom. Known as “the friendly city”, Port Elizabeth is enjoying an urban regeneration, spurred on by the youth of the region that wants to put it (back) on the map. Think vibrant creative projects spilling out wherever you go; a pedestrianized central zone, galleries selling local artworks, restaurants serving South African fusion food, award-winning buildings that house museums, restored Victorian terraces. Unsurprisingly, the boardwalk is buzzing. PE’s proximity to the excellent nature parks at Addo and Lalibela makes it an ideal destination for game lovers. Both of these parks are a little way from PE (70 and 90 kilometers east respectively) but both offer a chance to revel in South Africa’s no holds barred natural beauty. This is the real reason why people come to South Africa – for a chance to see the fabled Big Five. Addo even boasts the Big Seven (lion, elephant, rhino, buffalo, and leopard, as well as the great white shark and Southern right whale).

Day 4: East London

  • Ship
  • 1 Breakfast, 1 Lunch, 1 Dinner
A very British name tells us who established the city of East London. The British built this port on the Buffalo River in 1847 to service their military forts and troops in disputes over land with the Xhosa people. European settlement expanded and East London grew. Settlers usually walk in the footsteps of others who lived on the land before them. Here, many people must have resided over the years as the oldest footprints in the world, at 200,000 years, were found nearby. Most of the eight million Xhosa people live in Eastern Cape Province. They are a proud tribe with a rich and ongoing culture which they celebrate with vibrant clothing, music, and dance. Beaded jewelry is important for many reasons—decoration for dancers, special ceremonies, and indicating the social status of women. Today they live in an Africa with modern opportunities and challenges, and ongoing links to their past. The city has several natural attractions for residents and visitors alike. Sandy beaches are popular with residents, who also enjoy water activities on the sheltered and picturesque Buffalo River. Like many areas of South Africa, game parks are popular for local wildlife lovers. Speaking of nature, near to East London is where the first living (well freshly dead in an angler’s catch) coelacanth known to science was found in 1938. This lobe-finned fish had been only known from 66-million-year-old fossils. It is more closely related to four-legged land animals than typical ray-finned fish. This place has a history.
 

Day 5: Durban

  • Ship
  • 1 Breakfast, 1 Lunch, 1 Dinner
What is it about South Africa’s third most popular city that draws people so much? Is it the vibrant waterfront, complete with street performers and sand artists? Is it the melting pot of ethnicity, with all cultures from Zulu to Indian finding a home here? Is it the laid-back lifestyle that has locals calling it simply “Durbs”? Is it the sweeping landscape? The clement climate? One visit to Durban will quickly make you see the reason people love it so is a combination of all of the above. Durban has always been a beach city but it was the massive investment for the 2010 World Cup that really put it on the map. A huge revamp of the promenade has brought with it some fantastic eateries which serve up all kinds of “chow” from traditional bunny chow to bobotie, (a sweet spiced mince dish with an egg topping). Expect Asian influences wherever you go, too. Durban has the largest Indian population outside of India. Although there is little evidence, it is known that the city of eThekwini – Durban in Zulu – was inhabited by hunter-gatherers as early as 100,00 BC. It was first sighted by Vasco de Gamma in 1497, but it was not until 1824 that the British settlers raised the Union Jack. This was after King Shaka gifted a “25-mile strip of coast a hundred miles in-depth” to Henry Francis Fynn after Fynn helped him recover from a stab wound. It remained part of the British Commonwealth until 1960 when it became part of the Republic of South Africa. The city’s Euro-African heritage remains to this day.
 

Day 6-7: Richards Bay

  • Ship
  • 2 Breakfasts, 2 Lunches, 2 Dinners
Considered as the official gateway to Zululand, Richard’s Bay has morphed from being a tiny fishing village into a bustling harbor town. Today, the 30 km2 lagoon is the major part of the region (and also the deepest in Africa), a growth spurred on by the significant mineral deposits, wonderful wetland scenery, unspoiled beaches, and game reserves. Located on the north coast of KwaZulu-Natal, Richards Bay was founded in 1879. British Rear Admiral Sir Frederick William Richards eponymously named the port after landing there during the Anglo-Zulu colonial wars. Despite its superlative natural setting, Richards Bay was long considered a southern African backwater, with as little as 200 residents as recently as 1969. This number grew when it was proclaimed a town, but even today it is relatively underpopulated, with fewer than 60,000 calling the province home. The town’s Zulu heritage is omnipresent so be sure to look out for the local arts and crafts. Nearby Zulu village Dumazulu is the only Zulu village to be opened up to tourism by King Goodwill Zwelithini, and the only authentic example of Zulu traditions that foreigners are allowed to into. If African culture is not your cup of tea, the hinterland offers fascinating flora and fauna, including a chance to see the incredibly rare white rhino along with the bucket list Big Five. Richards Bay’s attractions can be found closer to port too – the 350 kilometers of coastland, also known as “Dolphin coast”, are a joy for divers and beach lovers alike.
 

Day 8-9: At Sea

  • Ship
  • 2 Breakfasts, 2 Lunches, 2 Dinners
Days at sea are the perfect opportunity to relax, unwind and catch up with what you’ve been meaning to do. So whether that is going to the gym, visiting the spa, whale watching, catching up on your reading, or simply topping up your tan, these blue sea days are the perfect balance to busy days spent exploring the shoreside.
 

Day 10: Island of Mozambique

  • Ship
  • 1 Breakfast, 1 Lunch, 1 Dinner
The densely populated Mozambique Island is small at only 3 km (1.9 miles) long and less than 500 meters (650 yards) wide. The Portuguese had already settled here by 1507, and the oldest European building in the southern hemisphere is found on Mozambique Island: the Chapel of Nossa Senhora de Baluarte. Fort São Sebastião also dates back to the 16th century. Historical buildings on the northern side of the island include the Palace and Chapel of São Paulo, built in 1610 as a Jesuit College — later converted to be the Governor’s Residence, and now a museum. As a result of its rich history and architectural remains, the Island of Mozambique is a UNESCO World Heritage Site. The majority of the residents today live in reed houses in Makuti Town at the southern end of the island. In addition to the old Christian churches, there are several mosques and even a Hindu temple on the island. For the last 55 years, a 3 km (1.9 miles) bridge has connected the island to the mainland.
 

Day 11: Moroni

  • Ship
  • 1 Breakfast, 1 Lunch, 1 Dinner
 Enjoy a half-day (four-hour) morning tour in the ancient town of Moroni, the capital of the Comores, and the main port of the island. Depart the pier and travel 10 minutes to the old quarter. There is time to explore the old quarter with its narrow winding alleys and ornately carved doors leading into private courtyards. The medina or old Arab quarter of Moroni, Grande Comore, Union of Comoros, has a Swahili air reminiscent of Zanzibar.

Day 12: Anjouan

  • Ship
  • 1 Breakfast, 1 Lunch, 1 Dinner
Anjouan is part of the Comoros Island located in the Mozambique Channel. It consists of the eroded remains of a large shield volcano that formed in the Pleistocene epoch. Eruptions from fissure vents spanned in three directions, followed by a long interval of erosion. Renewed volcanism produced a series of lava flows that filled deep valleys and flooded areas along the coast.The island is known for its steep, mountainous terrain and black sand beaches. Mount Ntringui is the highest point in the island of Anjouan with an elevation of 1,595 m (5,233 ft) above sea level.

Day 13: Ampangorinana, Nosy Komba | Nosy Be

  • Ship
  • 1 Breakfast, 1 Lunch, 1 Dinner
Ampangorinana is a village on the north coast of the beautiful and small volcanic island of Nosy Komba. The island is set between Nosy Be, the island of perfumes, and the mainland of Madagascar. Covered by a magnificent primal forest, the island is home to all kinds of trees, plants, and flowers, but lemurs are one of the main attractions. Not to be neglected and often hiding in the dense tropical forest is a multitude of other animals including maki macacos, chameleons, lizards, snakes, spiders, and 19 species of birds. Nosy Komba has easily accessible, clean, and private beaches that offer great snorkeling. Sea turtles, rays, and dolphins frequent the clear azure waters surrounding Ampangorinana and Nosy Komba.


If you have ever wanted to go somewhere that is remote and exotic, then you have come to the right place. The two right places in fact, as the islands of Nosy Be and Nosy Komba, offer a chance to revel in nature that is uncommon, even in the Indian Ocean. There is a saying in Madagascar “same, same but different” and nothing could be more illustrative when describing Nosy Be and Nosy Komba. Both feature fertile forests sheltering endemic species but while Nosy Be (meaning Big Island) attracts holidaymakers in search of a rustic, unhurried destination, Nosy Komba literally translates as Lemur Island, leaving nothing to the imagination when considering its main attractions. The aforementioned forests are without a doubt the jewel in both the islands’ crowns. The heady scent of ylang-ylang trees, vanilla, and pepper gave Madagascar its moniker of the perfumed isle, and exports of spices and scents continue to be a pivotal part of the island’s economy. The island is essentially French-speaking, after the queen of the Boina Sakalava tribe called upon the French from the nearby Reunion (thus inviting colonial rule) in 1841. If making the 20-minute boat trip to Nosy Komba (actual name Nosy Ambariovato) and the lemur park, then be prepared to be enchanted. The arboreal primates, with their enormous eyes, soft fur, and long curling tails are both charismatic and friendly. Add cheeky to the list too, especially if you have any fruit in your hands. They’ll jump right out of the trees and take it from you.

 

Day 14: Assumption

  • Ship
  • 1 Breakfast, 1 Lunch, 1 Dinner
Assumption (Assomption) Island is a small, crescent-shaped island about 4.3 square miles (11.07 sq km) in size. Considered one of the Outer Seychelles Islands, Assumption is part of the Aldabra Group, lying approximately 600 miles (960 km) southwest of Mahé, in the Indian Ocean. These outer islands are not made from granite, like their larger sisters Mahé, Praslin, or La Digue, but rather are coralline formations. Once a part of the French colony Réunion, then a member of the British Indian Ocean Territories, today Assumption is governed by Seychelles. The assumption is a rough and arid island, shaded only by shrubs and palm trees but is redeemed by a spectacular reef with huge coral heads and a white ocean floor. Jacques Cousteau said he'd never seen any other place on earth with the same clarity of water or diversity of reef life. He filmed large parts of the documentary “The Silent World” here, and held audiences across the globe, spellbound by the magic that lay beneath the sea. A notable feature of this island is the Assumption Island day gecko, a subspecies of gecko found only on this island. The assumption is also a known nesting site for turtles and rare birds. Because Assumption Island was found to be rich in guano, coveted for its phosphorous fertilizing abilities, it was essentially plundered in the early 1900s. The island today has interesting geography that includes a gorgeous 3-mile (5-km) white beach, a rocky coastline, caves, and two very large sand dunes prominent on the southeastern coast of the island, one of them reaching 104 feet (32 meters) high. There is a very small settlement with less than 10 registered inhabitants, mostly in place to service the small landing strip used by scientists with permission to study the neighboring Aldabra Atoll. The settlement is surrounded by Casuarina trees and there is an abandoned coconut palm plantation to its south. Pier Information The ship will be anchored off the coast of Assumption and tenders will land on the shoreline. We recommend you wear sturdy walking shoes, sun hats or scarves and bring your camera. Independently explore the island and relax on this peaceful dot in the ocean.

 

Day 15-16: Aldabra

  • Ship
  • 2 Breakfasts, 2 Lunches, 2 Dinners
/> Part of the Outer Islands of Seychelles, Aldabra is reputedly the world’s second-largest atoll and has been described as “one of nature’s treasures” and a “sanctuary”. The inner lagoon teems with marine life like eagle rays and sea turtles. It is possible to snorkel and drift along with the tide passing in or out of the lagoon as massive numbers of fish come and go through the same channels. Narrow channels between fossilized coral islands are fringed in mangrove forests supporting large colonies of nesting boobies and Great Frigatebirds. Its distinctive island fauna includes the Aldabra giant tortoise (Aldabrachelys gigantea). Approximately two-thirds of the world’s population of giant tortoises live on Aldabra – some 100,000 out of a reported 150,000. Because of its extreme isolation in the blue of the Indian Ocean, and due to a lack of fresh water, the island has not been developed for tourism. No airport has been built, and only a handful of smaller ships with special permits are allowed to call at this unique atoll.
 

Day 17: At Sea

  • Ship
  • 1 Breakfast, 1 Lunch, 1 Dinner
Days at sea are the perfect opportunity to relax, unwind and catch up with what you’ve been meaning to do. So whether that is going to the gym, visiting the spa, whale watching, catching up on your reading, or simply topping up your tan, these blue sea days are the perfect balance to busy days spent exploring the shoreside.
 

Day 18: Praslin & La Digue| Mahe

  • Ship
  • 1 Breakfast, 1 Lunch, 1 Dinner
Experience Old World beauty and charm of Seychelles in La Digue, and discover the natural wonder of the Vallée de Mai, in Praslin, a World Heritage Site, home to the fabled Coco de Mer.
Get ashore in La Digue and take a scenic drive from La Passe Harbor to L'Union Estate, experience daily life here, which moves at a relaxed pace that is punctuated by ox carts. Stop at the Veuve Reserve, where sharp-eyed bird watchers may be lucky enough to spot La Digue's Paradise Flycatcher with its distinctive black plumage.

Few places on Earth can claim to have been as blessed by nature as Mahe. Set in the remote Seychelles archipelago over 1,500 kilometers east of Mombasa, Mahe is the largest of the 115 islands and is home to so many stunning attractions you won’t know where to begin. For many Seychelles are the destination of a lifetime. Cerulean seas, miles and miles of beach, lush, tropical jungle, and surreal, natural beauty as far as the eye can see. Not only does Mahe boast 68 pristine beaches, but it is also dominated by the towering peaks of the Morne Seychellois National Park. This splendid National Park takes up over 20% of the island and is home to a vast amount of endemic flora and fauna, including the ultra-rare Seychelles Scops-owl. Unsurprisingly, the crystal clear waters are a diver’s heaven, promising a colorful cornucopia of underwater life, regardless of how experienced you are. Despite the island being visited in 1609 by the British, Mahe did not feature on any maps until 1742, when Frenchman Lazare Picault explored the as-yet-unnamed islands. However, it took a further 14 years for the French to lay claim to the islands, with the arrival of naval ship Le Cerf, captained by Corneille Morphey who christened the archipelago after Vicomte Moreau de Seychelles. He did this by setting down a Stone of Possession, which is on display in the National Museum. The first settlers arrived in 1770 and 15 years later the population had swelled to 130 – 7 Europeans and 123 slaves. Today, there are 80,000 Seychellois.

 

Day 19: Mahe| Disembark

  • 1 Breakfast
Enjpy breakfast in the morning. Disembark- end of cruise.

Ship/Hotel

Silver Cloud

Dates & Prices

My Preferred Start Date

Per person starting at
$25,200
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Vista Suite
240 ft² / 22m². Decks 4 and 5. Twin beds or queen-sized bed, large picture window with panoramic views, sitting area, and marble bathroom with shower.
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Veranda Suite
295 ft² / 27 m² including veranda (veranda 49 ft²/ 4.5 m²). Decks 6 and 7. Twin beds or queen-sized bed. Some suites accommodate three guests (Suites 505-510 and 605-610). Teak veranda with patio furniture and floor-to ceiling glass doors, sitting area, and marble bathroom with shower (some w/ tub/shower combination).
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Deluxe Veranda Suite
295 ft² / 27 m² including veranda (veranda 49 ft²/ 4.5 m²). Decks 5, 6, and 7. Twin beds or queen-sized bed. Some suites accommodate three guests. Teak veranda with patio furniture and floor-to ceiling glass doors, sitting area, and marble bathroom with shower (some w/ tub/shower combination).
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Medallion Suite
437 ft² / 40.6 m² including veranda (veranda 81 ft² / 7.6 m²). Decks 5, 6, and 7. Twin beds or queen-sized bed. Medallion Suites accommodate three guests. Teak veranda with patio furniture and floor-to ceiling glass doors, living room with convertible sofa, sitting area, dining area, and marble bathroom with shower.
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Silver Suite
541 ft² / 50 m² including veranda (veranda 92 ft² / 8 m²). Deck 7. Twin beds or queen-sized bed. Silver Suites accommodate three guests. Teak veranda with patio furniture and floor-to ceiling glass doors, living room with convertible sofa, sitting area, dining area, and marble bathroom with shower.
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Royal Suite
736 ft² / 69m² including veranda (veranda 126 ft² / 12 m²) for one-bedroom. Two-bedroom adjoining with Veranda suite: 1,031 ft² / 96m² including veranda (veranda 175 ft² / 16.5 m²). Deck 6. Twin beds or queen-sized bed. Teak veranda with patio furniture and floor-to ceiling glass doors, living room with sitting area, dining area, and marble bathroom with tub & separate shower.
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Grand Suite
1,019 ft² / 95 m² including veranda (veranda 145 ft² / 14 m²) for one-bedroom. Two-bedroom adjoining with a Veranda Suite: 1,314 ft² / 122 m² including veranda (veranda 194 ft² / 18.5 m²). Deck 7. Twin beds or queen-sized bed. Two teak verandas with patio furniture and floor-to ceiling glass doors, living room with sitting area, dining area, and marble bathroom with tub & separate shower.
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Owner's Suite
One-Bedroom: 587 ft² / 55 m² including veranda (veranda: 89 ft² / 8 m²). Two-Bedroom with adjoining Vista Suite: 827 ft² / 77 m² incl. veranda (veranda: 89 ft² / 8 m²). Deck 7. Twin beds or queen-sized bed. Large teak veranda with floor-to ceiling glass doors, living room with sitting area, dining area, and marble bathroom with tub & separate shower.

Notes

Expedition highlights and wildlife listed here are possible experiences only and cannot be guaranteed. Your expedition leader and captain will work together to ensure opportunities for adventure and exploration are the best possible, taking into account the prevailing weather and wildlife activity. Expedition team members scheduled for this voyage are subject to change or cancellation.

Included in cruise fare:
  • 1 Shore Excursion per port, per day
  • Spacious suites – over 80% with private verandas
  • Butler service in every suite
  • Unlimited Free Wifi
  • Personalised service – nearly one crew member for every guest
  • Multiple restaurants, diverse cuisine, open-seating dining
  • Beverages in-suite and throughout the ship, including champagne, select wines and spirits
  • 24-hour dining service
  • Onboard entertainment
  • Complimentary transportation into town in most ports
  • Onboard gratuities
Not included in cruise fare:
  • Airfare
  • Hotel accommodations
  • Transfers and luggage handling
  • Optional shore excursions
  • Meals ashore
  • Fuel surcharges
  • Accommodations while ashore
  • Casino gaming, laundry, or valet services
  • Purchases from the ship boutiques or any item or service of a personal nature such as medical care, massages, spa treatments, private fitness instruction, hair styling and manicures
  • Some champagne, premium wine and spirit selections, caviar, cigarettes and cigars are not included in your fare and may not be available at all times.
Included
  • 18 Breakfasts, 17 Lunches, 18 Dinners
  • 18 Nights Accommodations
  • Accommodations as listed
  • Ground transportation as listed
  • Excursions and activities as listed
  • Meals as listed
  • Personalized Service with a Butler for all Suites
  • Unlimited Free Wifi
  • Gratuities (Except Spa)
  • Room Service 
  • Onboard Entertainment 
  • Guided Zodiac, land and sea tours, and shoreside activities led by the Expeditions Team
  • Enrichment lectures by a highly qualified Expeditions Team
  • Beverages in-suite and throughout the ship, including champagne, select wines and spirits
Excluded
  • Travel Insurance
  • Personal Expenses
  • Flight costs (please request a quote)
  • Additional excursions during free time
  • Fuel and transportation surcharges (when applicable)
  • Some champagne, premium wine and spirit selections, caviar, cigarettes and cigars are not included in your fare.

Map

When to Go

Jan
Feb
Mar
Apr
May
Jun
Jul
Aug
Sep
Oct
Nov
Dec
Good to ideal period to travel, and many people choose to visit at this time.

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Everything was amazing! The planning with Adventure Life went smoothly. The actual trip was fantastic! One of the best trips I have experienced. The cruise staff members were knowledgeable and attentive. I will be writing more about this on the blog!
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