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Inkaterra Guides Field Station

Inkaterra Guides Field Station

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Inkaterra Guides Field Station Inkaterra Guides Field Station Inkaterra Guides Field Station Inkaterra Guides Field Station Inkaterra Guides Field Station Inkaterra Guides Field Station Inkaterra Guides Field Station Inkaterra Guides Field Station Inkaterra Guides Field Station Inkaterra Guides Field Station Inkaterra Guides Field Station Inkaterra Guides Field Station Inkaterra Guides Field Station Inkaterra Guides Field Station Inkaterra Guides Field Station Inkaterra Guides Field Station Inkaterra Guides Field Station
The Tambopata National Reserve is one of the last easily accessible virgin tropical rainforests in the world. The Reserve, a 274,690-hectare area (678,774-acre), offers a wealth of biodiversity, as well as magnificent natural landscapes. Puerto Maldonado, known as the “Capital of Biodiversity,” is the largest city of the Tambopata region. Overlooking the confluence of the Tambopata and Madre de Dios Rivers, Puerto Maldonado is 400 meters (1,312 feet) above sea level, 650 km (404 miles) from Cusco, and 15 km (9 miles) upriver from the Inkaterra lodge. The hotel is located 17km down the Madre de Dios River from Puerto Maldonado.

A place designed to enhance a Guide’s knowhow, interpretation skills, and leadership abilities; facilitate and promote Scientists/Investigators who are eager to engage in ongoing ITA projects or do research of their own; and host Inkaterra Travelers who want to experience the Amazon Rainforest in an intense and scholarly way. The specially selected Explorer Guides will guide both groups of Inkaterra Travelers and Student Groups during their stay at the station. 

Family cabañas (max 4 guests) or regular cabañas (2 guests) are available. Both options include 100% cotton sheets, a fleece blanket, extra blanket available, anti-allergic pillows, mosquito net; large personal bathroom, hot water, shampoo, conditioner and liquid soap dispensers, a set of clean towels; personal dividing closets with plenty hangers, personal working table with a security drawer. Free internet during electricity hours and housekeeping daily. Each Cabaña has a terrace.
  • One ceiling ventilator
  • Reading lamp
  • Rechargeable flashlight
  • Umbrella
  • Universal plug

Included services:
  • Welcome drink
  • Luggage service
  • Hot water showers
  • Shampoo, conditioner and soap
  • Complete set of towels per guest
  • Dining room and bar service
  • Capacity Breakfast lunch dinner bar
  • Buffet breakfast, lunch and dinner
  • Limited Electricity
  • Limited Complimentary Wifi
  • Excursions for Travelers with Inkaterra Explorer Guides
Hiking Machu Picchu
$2,174
EXPLORE

Incas and Rainforest

10 Day Itinerary
  • Watch for wildlife as you canoe
  • Take a night hike though the Amazon
  • Discover the ruins of Machu Picchu
  • Observe traditional weaving
Activities:
Archaeological Sites, Land, Local Market, Rainforest Exploration, Village Visit, Wilderness Lodge, Wildlife Viewing
Activity Level:
Relaxed
Tour Details
Sandoval Lake
$693
EXPLORE

Amazon Lodge Extension

4 Day Itinerary
  • Catamaran wildlife float
  • Spot Brown Capuchin Monkeys
  • Walk along rainforest trails
Activities:
Land, Rainforest Exploration, Wilderness Lodge, Wildlife Viewing
Activity Level:
Relaxed
Tour Details
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Everything was amazing! The planning with Adventure Life went smoothly. The actual trip was fantastic! One of the best trips I have experienced. The cruise staff members were knowledgeable and attentive. I will be writing more about this on the blog!
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Inkaterra Conservation Projects

Bio-Orchard
Inkaterra has launched an initiative to conserve a diverse collection of native edible and medicinal/ mystical plants, cultivated with regional agricultural or agroforestry techniques. Rescuing ancestral knowledge of Amazonian goods and carbon-free farming, the bio-orchard outreaches the preparation of natural compost, sowing and harvesting vegetables, aromatic herbs and tropical plants and the use of organic fertilizers. Amazonian peppers, cocona (Solanum sessiliflorum), sacha culantro (Eryngium foetidum), uncucha (Xanthosoma sagittifolium), maxixe (Cucumis anguria), among other crops, are being produced as part of this initiative to educate local communities on healthy nutrition to enhance their gastronomic identity, while exploring economic opportunities through sustainable entrepreneurship. 

Palmetum
Palm trees are essential for the ecology of tropical forests, while also representing one of the most important plant groups for the economic development of native communities. This forestry project aims to conserve the most diverse sample of native palms. Studying their features and cultural meaning, the Palmetum hosts 17 of the 23 species identified by the Ese’Eja culture and is used in 340 different ways. Species include Geonoma deversa, with large impermeable leaves used for thatched roof weaving in local architecture; the Yarina or ivory palm (Phytelephas macrocarpa), with valuable seeds employed in handcrafts; and the walking palm tree (Socratea exorrhiza), which moves its roots in search of sunlight.

Fauna monitoring
The fauna monitoring initiative contributes to flora and fauna inventories performed by Inkaterra since 1978, to determine the baseline and measure of ecotourism’s long-term impact over biodiversity. The motion-sensitive camera trap system installed around the property allows researchers to study the behavior of wildlife native to the Inkaterra areas of influence. With a thorough analysis of tracks and other indicators, areas with a rich diversity of Amazonian fauna are located and studied. A monthly total of over 1000 photos per camera have allowed the identification of 39 animal species, including ocelots (Leopardus wiedii), giant armadillos (Priodontes maximus), tapirs (Tapirus terrestris), collared peccaries (Tayassu tajacu), white-lipped peccaries (Tayassu pecari), tayras (Eira barbara) and tamanduas (T. tetradactyla). 

Bird monitoring
540 bird species have been registered within the areas conserved by Inkaterra Asociación in the Amazon rainforest of Madre de Dios. Four monitoring techniques are practiced, including bird banding for the codification of species dynamics. Bird banding contributes to ornithological research, through international codifications to study avifauna’s ecological dynamics and population. Biometric data including size, weight and wingspan is measured and registered in special formats to be collected in world databases. Inkaterra encourages the declaration of local reserves with the involvement of local communities for the conservation of endemic species, as well as providing a safe migratory route for birds flying from Canada/USA to Patagonia.

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