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Colorful canoes await passengers on the river

Grand Americas, Amazon & Antarctica

Example 80 Day Cruise aboard Seabourn Quest
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Embark on an 80-day Grand Voyage aboard the Seabourn Quest to take in the amazing sights and diverse culture of the Americas, Amazon, and Antarctica. Reflect on the engineering marvel that is the Panama Canal as your ship sails majestically out of the canal and into the Pacific Ocean for your first night. Admire the sights of the charming historic seaport of Montecristi. The Arenillas Ecological Reserve is comprised of two primary ecosystems: dry forest and bushland. Numerous endemic species found only in the southern equatorial dry forest inhabit this region, which has a high level of biodiversity. Explore Antarctica by kayak to discover the Great White Continent. As you quietly paddle past icebergs, acrobatic penguins, curious seals, and uncharted coastlines, keep an eye out for what Antarctica has next!
Downtown of the city of MiamiThe Gatun Locks of the Panama CanalRoyal penguin in AntarcticaPenguin jump in AntarcticaLone kayakerCamping in the Polar regionsTurtles and a butterflyA bald uakari in the Peruvian AmazonThe rainforest from aboveRiding a traditional canoe down the riverMacaw in the junglePerched macawsExplore colorful Bridgetown, BarbadosRelax on the sunny beaches of the CaribbeanFamous colorful huts in BarbadosColorful canoes await passengers on the river
Highlights
  • Kayak in Antarctica to witness some of the most amazing wildlife
  • See heroic explorer Sir Ernest Shackleton's grave in Grytviken, South Georgia
  • Take a trip to Buzios to see its beautiful beaches and lush tropical vegetation
  • See Pink river dolphins called 'botos' in Brazil's Guajara River, an Amazon tributary
  • Explore Carambola, home to the Caribbean’s most luxurious beach clubs
Activity Level: Relaxed
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Full Itinerary

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Day 1: Miami, Florida, US | Embark

Miami is the busiest cruise port in the world, hosting a myriad of ships year-round from all over the globe. Although it is technically not on the Caribbean Sea, no other American city exudes more of the diverse tropical appeal of the Caribbean. The city is home to a large and vibrant immigrant population that blends snowbird refugees from more northern climes with emigres from all Latin America and the Caribbean, as well as sizable groups from Europe, the Middle East and Asia. From the hot-blooded Art Deco haunts of South Beach to the natural wonders of the UNESCO-inscribed Everglades and the laid-back charms of the Keys, South Florida offers a bounty of appealing attractions that make an extended stay in the region nearly mandatory for those either embarking or disembarking here. 

Day 2-4: Days At Sea

  • Ship
  • 3 Breakfasts, 3 Lunches, 3 Dinners
Enjoy the cruise and avail of the activities and amenities on board. 

Day 5: Panama Canal Cristobal

  • Ship
  • 1 Breakfast, 1 Lunch, 1 Dinner
In the early morning, your ship joins the flotilla of hulls of every shape and purpose from the far corners of the globe. They gather in Limon Bay off the shoreline of Cristobal in the Caribbean Sea to form the day’s convoy. Soon you will parade in file into the mighty Gatun Locks, there to be lifted patiently by inrushing water through three steps and exit into Gatun Lake to begin your transit of the canal. In truth, your ship sails from west to east, threading the jungled Gaillard Cut and before arriving at the Pedro Miguel Locks to begin your descent to the Pacific Ocean. At the Miraflores Locks, your ship files through the three descending steps, lowered gracefully by the outrushing waters into the mouth of the canal, bidding farewell to your convoy, and sailing on into the largest ocean on earth.

Day 6: Fuerte Amador, Panama

  • Ship
  • 1 Breakfast, 1 Lunch, 1 Dinner
At the Pacific terminus of the Panama Canal, Fuerte Amador is a manmade causeway jutting into the sea, constructed with material excavated from the Canal. Originally built as a fortification, today it is a park, the headquarters of the Smithsonian Institute of Tropical Research, and landing area for ships anchored off the Canal, with shops and restaurants. With views of the skyline of Panama City, it serves as a staging area for excursions to nearby attractions in the city and the surrounding countryside. Panama City is a modern metropolis that has grown up around its Spanish colonial center, the Casco Viejo. A tour of the historic center and its impressive Gold Museum is one popular option. Other possibilities are sightseeing tours of the canal locks, the Canal expansion projects, a visit to an authentic Embera indian village, or aerial tours of the forest canopy and wildlife by tram.

Day 7: Days At Sea

  • Ship
  • 1 Breakfast, 1 Lunch, 1 Dinner
Enjoy the cruise and avail of the activities and amenities on board. 

Day 8-9: Manta, Ecuador

  • Ship
  • 2 Breakfasts, 2 Lunches, 2 Dinners
Manta is Ecuador's second largest port, north of Guayaquil which is the largest, and just south of the equator. With a population of approximately 140,000, Manta is a commercial center for fish and fruit, particularly bananas and plantains, which thrive in the tropical climate. However its beaches and quaint fishing villages have long attracted tourists. Shrimp, tuna and giant blue and striped marlin run in abundance in the waters off its coastal plain. Manta's culture is a vibrant patchwork of the heritage and traditions of the country's early Native American, Spanish and black African slave settlers.

Day 10: Puerto Bolivar (Machala), Ecuador

  • Ship
  • 1 Breakfast, 1 Lunch, 1 Dinner
Located in the fertile lowlands near the Gulf of Guayaquil, Machala is said to be the banana capital of the world. Coffee and cacao are also important crops in the surrounding farmlands. The cathedral is impressive, and the church of Nuestra Señora de Chilla has an impressive depiction of the Virgin and child bedecked in golden finery, attended by a rustic, a dog and a goat. Further afield, the Petrified Forest Puyango is the largest array of fossil trees in the world, with some measuring over six feet in diameter and nearly 50 feet long. 

Day 11: Days At Sea

  • Ship
  • 1 Breakfast, 1 Lunch, 1 Dinner
Enjoy the cruise and avail of the activities and amenities on board. 

Day 12: Islas Guanape, Peru

  • Ship
  • 1 Breakfast, 1 Lunch, 1 Dinner
This four-island group is a breeding ground for huge populations of seabirds off the coast of La Libertad, Peru. It was formerly exploited for the guano used as fertilizer. The islands are now protected and guano harvesting is strictly regulated. They are rich in bird life and marine wildlife, including pelicans, boobies, Humboldt penguins and Southern sea lions, which thrive in the nutrient-rich Humboldt Current along the Peruvian coast.

Day 13-14: Callao (Lima), Peru

  • Ship
  • 2 Breakfasts, 2 Lunches, 2 Dinners
A 45-minute drive from the port city of Callao brings you to exciting Lima, the City of Kings. From its founding in 1535 until today, it remains one of the most important cities in all South America. The handsome old buildings from the earliest colonial days surrounding the Plaza de Armas contrast with the soaring modern towers rising in the newer sections of the city.

Day 15: Islas Ballestas /General San Martin (Pisco), Peru

  • Ship
  • 1 Breakfast, 1 Lunch, 1 Dinner
The Ballestas Islands are an offshore cluster of rocky outcroppings teeming with seabirds, penguins, sea lions, dolphins and other wildlife. On shore, Pisco dates from 1640, and its Plaza de Armas is a Spanish colonial treasure. Many visitors take the opportunity to take a scenic flight over the huge, mysterious Nazca Lines pictographs etched into the nearby desert surface 2,000 years ago. And still more belly up to a bar to sample a Pisco Sour cocktail made with the Pisco brandy distilled from locally grown grapes. 

Pisco dates from 1640, and its Plaza de Armas is a Spanish colonial treasure. Another treasure is the Ballestas Islands, an offshore cluster of rocky outcroppings teeming with seabirds, penguins, sea lions, dolphins and other wildlife. Many visitors take the opportunity to take a scenic flight over the huge, mysterious Nazca Lines pictographs etched into the nearby desert surface 2,000 years ago. And still more belly up to a bar to sample a Pisco Sour cocktail made with the Pisco brandy distilled from locally grown grapes.

Day 16: Days At Sea

  • Ship
  • 1 Breakfast, 1 Lunch, 1 Dinner
Enjoy the cruise and avail of the activities and amenities on board. 

Day 17: Punta Islay / Matarani

  • Ship
  • 1 Breakfast, 1 Lunch, 1 Dinner
Punta Islay is on the Southern Peruvian coast, along the Lagunas de Mejia National Marine Sanctuary where the Tambo River meets the Pacific Ocean. This is a crucial environment supporting prolific populations of birds. The town is near the important Pacific seaport of Matarani, which provides easy access to the UNESCO World Heritage city of Arequipa inland. 

Shaped like an exuberant sea horse standing on its head, Mayotte is the most southerly and oldest of the Comoros islands, with relatively low, rounded hills and a prominent circling coral reef. A collective Territory of France, its inhabitants are EC citizens. This "island" actually consists of three main islands: Grande Terre, Petite Terre, and the rock of Dzaoudzi, and is a remarkable natural environment filled with birds, lemurs and numerous species of flora and other fauna.

Day 18: Iquique, Chile

  • Ship
  • 1 Breakfast, 1 Lunch, 1 Dinner
Iquique was the undisputed capital of the saltpeter, or nitrate industry from the 1860s to 1920. The town's historic center evinces this period with its many fine palatial buildings. After the Germans invented chemical fertilizer shortly before WWII, the nitrate industry collapsed and the city fell into decay. Today Iquique's economy is supported by its fishing industry and its tax free status. Driving outside the city into the desert, one can find many interesting well-preserved ghost towns that remain from the nitrate industry's hey-day. Some, including Humberstone, are now classified national monuments.

Day 19: Antofagasta, Chile

  • Ship
  • 1 Breakfast, 1 Lunch, 1 Dinner
A busy port hard by the arid and mysterious Atacama Desert of Northern Chile. With the wealth generated by minerals flowing from the barren land, they’ve managed to build a pleasant town of parks and plazas, conquering, for a while, the emptiness beyond. See the English clock ensconced in the Plaza Colon by British residents, and the uniquely hybrid architecture of the Customs House. In the manicured gardens and verges along Avenida O’Higgins, soil imported as ballast aboard visiting ore ships was used to augment the desert sands and nourish the greenery.

Day 20: Isla Pan De Azucar, Chile

  • Ship
  • 1 Breakfast, 1 Lunch, 1 Dinner
Where the Atacama Desert meets the sea, small “Sugar Loaf Island” sits just offshore of the sprawling National Park named for it. The region is a unique ecosystem where flora and fauna are sustained by the Camanchaca mists from the sea. A variety of cactuses thrive here, and dramatic rocky outcrops are interspersed with wide sandy beaches. On the island, breeding colonies of sea lions, sea otters, pelicans and Humboldt penguins lounge in protected peace, fussing, chattering and cavorting as you float just offshore. (Landing is forbidden.)

Day 21: Days At Sea

  • Ship
  • 1 Breakfast, 1 Lunch, 1 Dinner
Enjoy the cruise and avail of the activities and amenities on board. 

Day 22: San Antonio (Santiago), Chile

  • Ship
  • 1 Breakfast, 1 Lunch, 1 Dinner
Thirteen thousand years ago prehistoric peoples inhabited the coastline of central Chile. They were nomadic hunter-gatherers living off of the rich resources of this coastal region. Today, the bustling port of San Antonio and its 90,000 inhabitants, occupies the same land and is the busiest freight handler on the western coast of South America. Founded in 1894 as the main port for Chile’s capital city Santiago, it came into prominence when the Spanish destroyed the port of Valpariaso in the war of 1866, making it the only option for moving goods in and out of the country. Located 117 kilometers (73 miles) west of Greater Santiago’s 7,000,000 people, San Antonio is also the hub for Chile’s fishing industry. The region’s Mediterranean climate, supports one of Chile’s most prestigious vineyards, Viña Casa Marín, recognized as one of the 100 best vineyards in the world and Chile’s closest vineyard to the Pacific Ocean. Isla Negra, the home of Chile’s national poet Pablo Neruda is also located nearby. 

Day 23: Days At Sea

  • Ship
  • 1 Breakfast, 1 Lunch, 1 Dinner
Enjoy the cruise and avail of the activities and amenities on board. 

Day 24: Scenic Cruising Reloncavi Sound/Puerto Montt, Chile

  • Ship
  • 1 Breakfast, 1 Lunch, 1 Dinner
Puerto Montt, in Chile’s Northern Patagonia Los Lagos region is set on the shores of a large bay identified as Reloncavi Sound. To the east looms Mt. Yate, a snowcapped, glaciated stratovolcano, and beyond that the cordillera of the Andes. The sound is punctuated by islands, the three largest being Tengio, Maillén and Huar. Two much larger islands, Puluqiui and Queulín, sprawl across the mouth of the sound, separating it from the Gulf of Ancud. The point where the Reloncavi Estuary empties into the sound is effectively where the Chilean Central Valley meets the Pacific Ocean.  Salmon farms dimple the coves of the sound, and pods of orcas are sometimes seen. Near the sound on shore, Chile’s Alerce Andino National Park protects a vestigial forest of ancient alerce trees,  similar to the huge sequoias found in North America. 

Puerto Montt sits beneath a skyline of snow-capped volcanoes. Volcan Osorno towering 2,652-meter (8,701’) above the town, erupted in 1835 and was described by naturalist Charles Darwin. The town sits at the gateway to a myriad of outdoor adventures including an exhilarating white-water rafting trip, tranquil fly fishing and scenic hiking in Alerce Andino National Park. Petrohue Rapids and Lake Llanquihue, are set within a rural landscape of sheep farms. A walk around town allows for an encounter into the South American way of life. A vibrant fish market, selling everything from seaweed to salmon to spiny crabs sits astride a street lined with craft stalls packed to the brim with brightly colored woolen ponchos. South American fur seals lounge along the seawall promenade as colorful fishing boats lay at anchor offshore. Puerto Montt is an eclectic mix of new and old, refined and rustic. 
Reloncaví Sound is a panoramic vista of high volcanoes. To the south, is scenic Moraleda Channel and the entrance to the picturesque Chilean Fjords.

Day 25: Scenic Cruising Gulf Of Corcovado / Castro, Isla Chiloe, Chile

  • Ship
  • 1 Breakfast, 1 Lunch, 1 Dinner
The Gulf of Corcovado is a large body of water between Chiloe Island and the coast of Chile. It is surrounded by the Corcovado National Park on the east and Chiloe Island’s Valdivian forest on the west. On the eastern horizon rise the snowcapped volcanic cones of Corcovado and Yanteles. The shoreline is largely unspoiled and forests of southern beech and the magnificent alerce (similar to North American sequoia) trees predominate. The waters are dotted with islands, leading to the bay and harbor of Chiloe’s primary town, Castro. The Gulf is actually a submerged fore-basin carved by a massive glacier. The waters are home to some endangered species, including blue whales, as well as humpback, minke and sei whales. Salmon farms have blossomed in recent years.
Cruise this important, weather-protected shipping channel between the long, mountainous Pitt Island and the equally mountainous mainland of British Columbia’s northern coast. 


The towns are largely built of abundant local woods, and many houses are elaborately shingled in intricate designs. Even the cathedral is a beautiful, vaulted structure crafted of local hardwoods. The forest and the sea are the source of livelihood and much more in this rustic outpost.

 

Day 26: Cruising Chilean Fjords

  • Ship
  • 1 Breakfast, 1 Lunch, 1 Dinner
Your ship threads among the islands and waterways along Chile’s wild southern coastline. Looming, glacier polished walls of rock rise sheer from the water, furred with vegetation wherever a crevasse or groove offers foothold. Lacy veils of waterfalls tinsel the surfaces and make ripples in the mirrored sea below. In the distance, a lone fishing boat plies patiently by. Rings of brightly colored floats mark the circular fish farms encircling silvery schools of salmon to feed a hungry world outside. In other places, the shoreline is dense with twisted dwarf forest, buffeted by the endless passing winds. Steamer ducks splash frantically out of the way as your ship glides toward them, and a sea lion’s head leaves a wake of silver as it swims away. A scene of primeval nature unreels as you watch, bewitched, from your lofty vantage point.

Day 27: Scenic Cruising Sarmiento Channel and El Brujo Glacier

  • Ship
  • 1 Breakfast, 1 Lunch, 1 Dinner
Canal Sarmiento, or the Sarmiento Channel, is a protected inside passage that runs generally north-and-south along Chile’s Pacific Coast between the mainland and Esperanza, Vancouver and Piazzi Islands. It is in the Magallanes y Antárctica Chilena region. Although the native Kawésgar people routinely navigated the channel for 6,000 years up until the 20th century, it was named for the first European to do so, the Spanish explorer Pedro Sarmiento de Gamboa, who sailed it in 1579-80. The channel begins at the Guia Narrows on the north end, and runs general south-to-southeast for approximately 64 miles, passing Esperanza Island on the west with mountain peaks of 300 to over 1000 meters, before turning eastward into the Farquhar Pass. It then turns southward again, merging with the Collingwood Strait for approximately eight miles, at which time the Cordillera Sarmiento rises on the eastern side, crowned with snow-capped peaks, several tidewater glaciers, and a number of shipwrecks on the shore. Finally, the channel turns westward through the Victoria Pass the join the Smyth Channel.

Entering Peel Fjord from the Sarmiento Channel in southern Chile, your ship veers into the branch called Asia Fjord. As you cruise deeper into the fjord, the water’s surface is dappled with floating ‘bergie bits’ of ice, and occasional larger growlers. Meanwhile the steep slopes on either side are tinseled with lacy waterfalls flowing from the snow-frosted peaks above.  Ahead, two ochre slopes cradle a glowing blue-white face of cracked and fissured ice two kilometers across and hundreds of feet high, spilling with geologic slowness from the South Patagonian Ice Field far up the valley. Occasionally a huge shard of ice falls silently into the sea, followed seconds later by the delayed sound of its crack and thunder. You are in the midst of Chile’s Bernardo O’Higgins National Park, the nation’s largest protected region. 

 

Day 28: Punta Arenas, Chile/ Strait Of Magellan

  • Ship
  • 1 Breakfast, 1 Lunch, 1 Dinner
Punta Arenas is the most important port and commercial center for the immense Patagonian agricultural area of Chile. The economy revolves around the sheep raised on the expansive pampas. Located on the Strait of Magellan separating the mainland from the island of Tierra del Fuego, the city proclaims itself the southernmost city in the world. Its colonial history may be explored in the splendid Plaza de Armas, in the magnificent tombs of the Pioneer Cemetery and the opulent Braun-Menendez Mansion. The heritage of Ferdinand Magellan’s exploration can be recaptured at the Nao Victoria ship museum. Fort Bulnes national monument memorializes the earliest colonial period, while the offshore Los Pinguinos Natural Monument preserves the thriving seabird and sea lion colonies around Magdalena Island. This is also the port from which a full-day flight excursion takes visitors to the majestic peaks and picturesque lakes and wildlife of the Torres del Paine National Park.

The Strait of Magellan is a 350-mile/570 km channel separating the mainland of South America from the large Isla Grande de Tierra del Fuego and connecting the Atlantic and Pacific Oceans. It was first navigated by the explorer Ferdinand Magellan during his circumnavigation voyage in 1520. He named it the Strait of All Saints, because his transit started on November 1, All Saints Day. It was also Magellan who name the southern island Tierra del Fuego, after seeing the smokes from fires in the camps of the native Yahgan people, whom he named the Patagones, meaning “big feet,” and their land Patagonia. The strait is between two and 20 miles wide, and earned the nickname Dragon’s Tail among sailors, for its tortuous path. Along with the Beagle Channel, it was one of two protected channels for sailing between the oceans prior to the construction of the Panama Canal The third alternative was the notoriously turbulent open ocean Drake Passage beyond Cape Horn. There is one sizeable port city in the strait, Punta Arenas, Chile, which has an interesting harbor breakwater consisting of two ship hulks, the Cavenga and an old iron four-mast sailing ship, the County of Peebles. There are several Chilean national parks and monuments in the strait, including Los Pinguinos National Monument and a sanctuary for protecting humpback whales. Southern right whales are also known to frequent the strait’s waters. There are 41 light signals in the strait, including the San Isidro Lighthouse that has been restored and is now a museum, and the Evangelistas Lighthouse at the western entrance. The strait was very difficult for sailing ships, due to unpredictable winds and tidal currents. Depending on tide conditions, even modern ships often opt for one of the alternative routes, because the tidal speeds are greatly exaggerated by the Venturi effect through narrows.

Day 29-30: Days at Sea

  • Ship
  • 2 Breakfasts, 2 Lunches, 2 Dinners
Enjoy the cruise and avail of the activities and amenities on board. 

Day 31: Antarctic Experience

  • Ship
  • 1 Breakfast, 1 Lunch, 1 Dinner
Antarctica! The name alone conjures up images of boundless ice, towering icebergs, comedic penguins, epic snowstorms, great sailing ships held tightly by ice and the hardy explorers striving to survive wrapped in thick, heavy parkas. All of this is, or once was, true. Today, vessels have changed and the level of safety on a journey to ‘The Great White Continent’ has increased immensely. Antarctica is the truest of wild places, the majesty of its pristine natural landscapes is second to no other location on earth.
The animals that thrive in the rigors of the Antarctic climate are present in such great numbers and concentrations that they must be seen to be believed. This untouched oasis harkens back to a time when the world was untouched by humanity, pure in its natural innocence. Antarctica has been a source of natural inspiration for as long as humans have been aware of its existence -- and it may produce in you one of the most exceptional emotional sensations it is possible to experience on our great planet.

Day 32: Antarctic Experience

  • Ship
  • 1 Breakfast, 1 Lunch, 1 Dinner
Antarctica! The name alone conjures up images of boundless ice, towering icebergs, comedic penguins, epic snowstorms, great sailing ships held tightly by ice and the hardy explorers striving to survive wrapped in thick, heavy parkas. All of this is, or once was, true. Today, vessels have changed and the level of safety on a journey to ‘The Great White Continent’ has increased immensely. Antarctica is the truest of wild places, the majesty of its pristine natural landscapes is second to no other location on earth.
The animals that thrive in the rigors of the Antarctic climate are present in such great numbers and concentrations that they must be seen to be believed. This untouched oasis harkens back to a time when the world was untouched by humanity, pure in its natural innocence. Antarctica has been a source of natural inspiration for as long as humans have been aware of its existence -- and it may produce in you one of the most exceptional emotional sensations it is possible to experience on our great planet.

Day 33: Antarctic Experience

  • Ship
  • 1 Breakfast, 1 Lunch, 1 Dinner
Antarctica! The name alone conjures up images of boundless ice, towering icebergs, comedic penguins, epic snowstorms, great sailing ships held tightly by ice and the hardy explorers striving to survive wrapped in thick, heavy parkas. All of this is, or once was, true. Today, vessels have changed and the level of safety on a journey to ‘The Great White Continent’ has increased immensely. Antarctica is the truest of wild places, the majesty of its pristine natural landscapes is second to no other location on earth.
The animals that thrive in the rigors of the Antarctic climate are present in such great numbers and concentrations that they must be seen to be believed. This untouched oasis harkens back to a time when the world was untouched by humanity, pure in its natural innocence. Antarctica has been a source of natural inspiration for as long as humans have been aware of its existence -- and it may produce in you one of the most exceptional emotional sensations it is possible to experience on our great planet.

Day 34: Antarctic Experience

  • Ship
  • 1 Breakfast, 1 Lunch, 1 Dinner
Antarctica! The name alone conjures up images of boundless ice, towering icebergs, comedic penguins, epic snowstorms, great sailing ships held tightly by ice and the hardy explorers striving to survive wrapped in thick, heavy parkas. All of this is, or once was, true. Today, vessels have changed and the level of safety on a journey to ‘The Great White Continent’ has increased immensely. Antarctica is the truest of wild places, the majesty of its pristine natural landscapes is second to no other location on earth.
The animals that thrive in the rigors of the Antarctic climate are present in such great numbers and concentrations that they must be seen to be believed. This untouched oasis harkens back to a time when the world was untouched by humanity, pure in its natural innocence. Antarctica has been a source of natural inspiration for as long as humans have been aware of its existence -- and it may produce in you one of the most exceptional emotional sensations it is possible to experience on our great planet.

Day 35: Antarctic Experience

  • Ship
  • 1 Breakfast, 1 Lunch, 1 Dinner
Antarctica! The name alone conjures up images of boundless ice, towering icebergs, comedic penguins, epic snowstorms, great sailing ships held tightly by ice and the hardy explorers striving to survive wrapped in thick, heavy parkas. All of this is, or once was, true. Today, vessels have changed and the level of safety on a journey to ‘The Great White Continent’ has increased immensely. Antarctica is the truest of wild places, the majesty of its pristine natural landscapes is second to no other location on earth.
The animals that thrive in the rigors of the Antarctic climate are present in such great numbers and concentrations that they must be seen to be believed. This untouched oasis harkens back to a time when the world was untouched by humanity, pure in its natural innocence. Antarctica has been a source of natural inspiration for as long as humans have been aware of its existence -- and it may produce in you one of the most exceptional emotional sensations it is possible to experience on our great planet.

Day 36-37: Days at Sea

  • Ship
  • 2 Breakfasts, 2 Lunches, 2 Dinners
Enjoy the amenities and activities onboard.

Day 38: South Georgia Experience

  • Ship
  • 1 Breakfast, 1 Lunch, 1 Dinner
South Georgia may include the following experiences. The exact itinerary is subject to permissions, weather, ice conditions and time available. The daily program will be determined by the Expedition Team and is subject to site availability.
Cooper Bay, South Georgia
A wealth of wildlife and awe-inspiring scenery reward those who visit Cooper Bay, a hidden gem awaiting discovery at the southeastern-most extremity of South Georgia. Four species of penguins nest and breed at Cooper Bay, including the island’s largest chinstrap penguin colony, together with colonies of macaroni and gentoo penguins and a small number of king penguins.
While macaroni penguins are the most abundant species on South Georgia, with numbers estimated at ten million, they are usually extremely hard to find. Elsewhere, they nest on inaccessibly high cliffs and steep rocky slopes, making Cooper Bay one of the few easily accessible locations. Giant petrels and both light-mantled and sooty albatrosses find safe nesting sites among the waist-high tussock grass that covers the steep slopes above the bay. Masses of fur seals swarm the beaches and are often seen playing in the kelp beds offshore.
Cooper Bay was named after Robert Cooper, First Lieutenant of James Cook’s ship HMS Resolution that visited here in 1775.
 
Drygalski Fjord, South Georgia
Drygalski Fjord is one of the most scenic areas of South Georgia, and also one of the windiest. Its narrow, two-and-a-half mile (4 km) waterway is bordered by steep-sided rock walls crowned by spectacular snow-covered peaks rising to over a 3,200’ (1,000 m). At the head of the fjord looms the mass of the Risting Glacier. The sharply pointed ice pinnacles and deep blue crevasses of its massive face occasionally send huge blocks of ice thundering into the water.
Despite its impressive and seemingly inhospitable appearance, Drygalski Fjord supports a surprising amount of wildlife. This is the main breeding area in South Georgia for snow petrels. Blue-eyed shags, Wilson’s storm petrels, and Antarctic terns are common visitors, and the fjord is also the northernmost recorded breeding site for Weddell seals.
The fjord was named to honor Professor Eric Von Drygalski, leader of the First German Antarctic Expedition of 1901-03.
 
Fortuna Bay, South Georgia
Scenic Fortuna Bay offers both prolific wildlife viewing and a magnificent panorama from its beach of jagged summit peaks and the impressive expanse of the Konig Glacier. Named after the first whale-catcher to operate here in the early 1900s, Fortuna Bay was used by early explorers and sealers long before the establishment of whaling stations on South Georgia.
It boasts a large population of elephant and fur seals along its mile-and-a-half (2km) long pebble beach. Seal pups congregate here in huge numbers. The curious pups run to and fro, playing frisky games and exploring the world around them, resembling a chaotic animal kindergarten. The bay also supports a colony of several thousand photogenic king penguins, the largest on South Georgia.
The best-known human history of Fortuna Bay comes from the tribulations of Sir Ernest Shackleton. It was here that he and his companions descended to the bay in 1916, after a treacherous crossing of the island’s ice cap, to reach their rescuers at the Stromness Whaling Station.
 
Gold Harbour, South Georgia
Gold Harbour, its small, crescent cove framed by the glacier-covered peaks of the Salvesen Range, is regarded as one of the most beautiful areas in all of South Georgia. The prominent icefall of the Betrab Glacier hangs dramatically from the cliffs above, from time to time releasing a large ice block to fall thundering into the sea.
The highlight of a visit to Gold Harbour is the large colony of king penguins that covers the length of the beach. Raucous penguin calls fill the air with never-ending whistles and chatters as fluffy penguin chicks roam the beach in search of their parents. A small gentoo penguin colony has tucked itself in amongst the grass nearby. Massive elephant seals, weighing thousands of pounds, lounge at the water’s edge, while leopard seals lurk off the beach in hopes of a careless penguin. Above, light-mantled albatrosses glide along the cliff faces as giant petrels hover over the colony.
 
Grytviken, South Georgia
Tucked in at the head of King Edward Cove and encircled by steep rugged mountains is the capital of South Georgia, Grytviken. It was established by the Norwegian captain Carl Larsen in 1904 as the island’s first land-based whaling station, and its name literally means “Pot Bay” for the number of seal- oil try-pots left here by early sealers.
Over 300 people lived in Grytviken during its busiest years. Nowadays it resembles a ghost town strewn with the remnants of rusty oil tanks, oil processing plants and the skeletons of derelict whaling vessels. The house of the station manager has been restored to become the South Georgia Museum. The Lutheran church and the white crosses of the cemetery are restored to their former state and stand in stark contrast to the verdant green peaks above. A monument marks the grave of the heroic British explorer Sir Ernest Shackleton, affectionately known by his men as ‘the boss.’ Grytviken also has its own post office, selling unique South Georgia stamps, while across the cove is the British Scientific Station at King Edward Point.
 
Salisbury Plain, South Georgia
Salisbury Plain is a stunningly beautiful place to visit. It was deposited by retreating glaciers along the shore of the Bay of Isles, and resembles an open stage rimmed by a towering amphitheater of snow-capped mountains. Its name first appeared on British Admiralty charts in 1930 and likely refers to the similarly named feature back in England.
Salisbury Plain is home to the second largest king penguin colony on the island. It is immense in size and overwhelming in numbers, with over 250,000 birds nesting, breeding, and molting on its shores. Penguins are everywhere, dotting the beach and covering the adjacent hillsides. A cacophony of trumpeting and chirping adult penguins and whistling chicks fills the air against a rhythmic backdrop of the surf crashing on the beach.
One of South Georgia’s largest elephant seal populations also comes to haul out along this 1.8 mile (3 km) long pebble beach. Fur seals are here in great abundance, hustling between penguin congregations and clusters of massive elephant seals in a scene of controlled biological chaos!
 
South Georgia
Remote and forbidding South Georgia, the most rugged of all sub-Antarctic islands, digests the fury of the stormy Southern Seas. The island’s dramatic glacier-covered mountains rise sharply and are crowned by Mount Paget at 6,900’ (2935m). Some 50 percent of South Georgia is permanently covered by glaciers, nourished by the proximity of the Antarctic Circumpolar Current.
The cold, surrounding seas in this area the most nutrient-rich on earth, and make South Georgia a mecca for wildlife. Amidst the vastness of the Southern Ocean, it is a place of pilgrimage for penguins: a place to feed, to breed, and to rear young. Over 250,000 king penguins return to South Georgia annually, transforming its bays and beaches into a mosaic of motion and sound. Several other species of penguins, along with skuas, petrels, albatrosses, pipits and other birds nest along its shores. A few million fur seals hustle about like playful puppies, and hundreds of thousands of elephant seals gather in haul-outs so unimaginably immense they must be seen to be believed.
 
St Andrews Bay, South Georgia
Few places on earth are as immensely grand as St Andrews Bay. This is a place of such sheer vast scale that it must be truly experienced to be believed. Its wave-battered, windswept beaches border a broad plain left behind by retreating glaciers, their white snouts clearly visible at the base of the mountains.
The desolation left behind by the glaciers didn’t stay vacant for long. The void was filled by literally hundreds of thousands of king penguins, gathering in one of the largest colonies on earth. Take the time to climb onto the crest of the moraine view to the unforgettable sight of a sea of penguins standing shoulder to shoulder. One of the largest Elephant seals haul-outs on the island is also here. In the early summer months, the beach seems carpeted by animals, an ever-changing labyrinth of massive gray forms and shapes. They growl and grunt while the wails and whimpers of fur seals fill the air from afar.
 The name Stromness is tied in history books to one of the greatest human endeavors of adversity and hope ever recorded. It was here that Sir Ernest Shackleton and his companions arrived in 1916 after an arduous 36-hour crossing of the island, traversing uncharted ice caps and treacherous mountain terrain, and finally reached this remote outpost of civilization.
Stromness Bay on the northern coast of South Georgia once housed a prominent whaling station. Established in 1907 as a site for a factory ship, it was enlarged in 1912 when the processing moved on shore. Buildings were constructed, and the population of the station dramatically increased. In 1961, it was abandoned to the mercy of the elements, and today the station’s ghostly appearance has given way to the forces of nature. Fur seals have reclaimed the bay and the occupy the ruins. Often, hundreds of fur seal pups only a few weeks old congregate on the beach and around the station, playing, fighting, hustling and running among the remnants of the abandoned equipment.

Day 39: South Georgia Experience

  • Ship
  • 1 Breakfast, 1 Lunch, 1 Dinner
South Georgia may include the following experiences. The exact itinerary is subject to permissions, weather, ice conditions and time available. The daily program will be determined by the Expedition Team and is subject to site availability.
Cooper Bay, South Georgia
A wealth of wildlife and awe-inspiring scenery reward those who visit Cooper Bay, a hidden gem awaiting discovery at the southeastern-most extremity of South Georgia. Four species of penguins nest and breed at Cooper Bay, including the island’s largest chinstrap penguin colony, together with colonies of macaroni and gentoo penguins and a small number of king penguins.
While macaroni penguins are the most abundant species on South Georgia, with numbers estimated at ten million, they are usually extremely hard to find. Elsewhere, they nest on inaccessibly high cliffs and steep rocky slopes, making Cooper Bay one of the few easily accessible locations. Giant petrels and both light-mantled and sooty albatrosses find safe nesting sites among the waist-high tussock grass that covers the steep slopes above the bay. Masses of fur seals swarm the beaches and are often seen playing in the kelp beds offshore.
Cooper Bay was named after Robert Cooper, First Lieutenant of James Cook’s ship HMS Resolution that visited here in 1775.
 
Drygalski Fjord, South Georgia
Drygalski Fjord is one of the most scenic areas of South Georgia, and also one of the windiest. Its narrow, two-and-a-half mile (4 km) waterway is bordered by steep-sided rock walls crowned by spectacular snow-covered peaks rising to over a 3,200’ (1,000 m). At the head of the fjord looms the mass of the Risting Glacier. The sharply pointed ice pinnacles and deep blue crevasses of its massive face occasionally send huge blocks of ice thundering into the water.
Despite its impressive and seemingly inhospitable appearance, Drygalski Fjord supports a surprising amount of wildlife. This is the main breeding area in South Georgia for snow petrels. Blue-eyed shags, Wilson’s storm petrels, and Antarctic terns are common visitors, and the fjord is also the northernmost recorded breeding site for Weddell seals.
The fjord was named to honor Professor Eric Von Drygalski, leader of the First German Antarctic Expedition of 1901-03.
 
Fortuna Bay, South Georgia
Scenic Fortuna Bay offers both prolific wildlife viewing and a magnificent panorama from its beach of jagged summit peaks and the impressive expanse of the Konig Glacier. Named after the first whale-catcher to operate here in the early 1900s, Fortuna Bay was used by early explorers and sealers long before the establishment of whaling stations on South Georgia.
It boasts a large population of elephant and fur seals along its mile-and-a-half (2km) long pebble beach. Seal pups congregate here in huge numbers. The curious pups run to and fro, playing frisky games and exploring the world around them, resembling a chaotic animal kindergarten. The bay also supports a colony of several thousand photogenic king penguins, the largest on South Georgia.
The best-known human history of Fortuna Bay comes from the tribulations of Sir Ernest Shackleton. It was here that he and his companions descended to the bay in 1916, after a treacherous crossing of the island’s ice cap, to reach their rescuers at the Stromness Whaling Station.
 
Gold Harbour, South Georgia
Gold Harbour, its small, crescent cove framed by the glacier-covered peaks of the Salvesen Range, is regarded as one of the most beautiful areas in all of South Georgia. The prominent icefall of the Betrab Glacier hangs dramatically from the cliffs above, from time to time releasing a large ice block to fall thundering into the sea.
The highlight of a visit to Gold Harbour is the large colony of king penguins that covers the length of the beach. Raucous penguin calls fill the air with never-ending whistles and chatters as fluffy penguin chicks roam the beach in search of their parents. A small gentoo penguin colony has tucked itself in amongst the grass nearby. Massive elephant seals, weighing thousands of pounds, lounge at the water’s edge, while leopard seals lurk off the beach in hopes of a careless penguin. Above, light-mantled albatrosses glide along the cliff faces as giant petrels hover over the colony.
 
Grytviken, South Georgia
Tucked in at the head of King Edward Cove and encircled by steep rugged mountains is the capital of South Georgia, Grytviken. It was established by the Norwegian captain Carl Larsen in 1904 as the island’s first land-based whaling station, and its name literally means “Pot Bay” for the number of seal- oil try-pots left here by early sealers.
Over 300 people lived in Grytviken during its busiest years. Nowadays it resembles a ghost town strewn with the remnants of rusty oil tanks, oil processing plants and the skeletons of derelict whaling vessels. The house of the station manager has been restored to become the South Georgia Museum. The Lutheran church and the white crosses of the cemetery are restored to their former state and stand in stark contrast to the verdant green peaks above. A monument marks the grave of the heroic British explorer Sir Ernest Shackleton, affectionately known by his men as ‘the boss.’ Grytviken also has its own post office, selling unique South Georgia stamps, while across the cove is the British Scientific Station at King Edward Point.
 
Salisbury Plain, South Georgia
Salisbury Plain is a stunningly beautiful place to visit. It was deposited by retreating glaciers along the shore of the Bay of Isles, and resembles an open stage rimmed by a towering amphitheater of snow-capped mountains. Its name first appeared on British Admiralty charts in 1930 and likely refers to the similarly named feature back in England.
Salisbury Plain is home to the second largest king penguin colony on the island. It is immense in size and overwhelming in numbers, with over 250,000 birds nesting, breeding, and molting on its shores. Penguins are everywhere, dotting the beach and covering the adjacent hillsides. A cacophony of trumpeting and chirping adult penguins and whistling chicks fills the air against a rhythmic backdrop of the surf crashing on the beach.
One of South Georgia’s largest elephant seal populations also comes to haul out along this 1.8 mile (3 km) long pebble beach. Fur seals are here in great abundance, hustling between penguin congregations and clusters of massive elephant seals in a scene of controlled biological chaos!
 
South Georgia
Remote and forbidding South Georgia, the most rugged of all sub-Antarctic islands, digests the fury of the stormy Southern Seas. The island’s dramatic glacier-covered mountains rise sharply and are crowned by Mount Paget at 6,900’ (2935m). Some 50 percent of South Georgia is permanently covered by glaciers, nourished by the proximity of the Antarctic Circumpolar Current.
The cold, surrounding seas in this area the most nutrient-rich on earth, and make South Georgia a mecca for wildlife. Amidst the vastness of the Southern Ocean, it is a place of pilgrimage for penguins: a place to feed, to breed, and to rear young. Over 250,000 king penguins return to South Georgia annually, transforming its bays and beaches into a mosaic of motion and sound. Several other species of penguins, along with skuas, petrels, albatrosses, pipits and other birds nest along its shores. A few million fur seals hustle about like playful puppies, and hundreds of thousands of elephant seals gather in haul-outs so unimaginably immense they must be seen to be believed.
 
St Andrews Bay, South Georgia
Few places on earth are as immensely grand as St Andrews Bay. This is a place of such sheer vast scale that it must be truly experienced to be believed. Its wave-battered, windswept beaches border a broad plain left behind by retreating glaciers, their white snouts clearly visible at the base of the mountains.
The desolation left behind by the glaciers didn’t stay vacant for long. The void was filled by literally hundreds of thousands of king penguins, gathering in one of the largest colonies on earth. Take the time to climb onto the crest of the moraine view to the unforgettable sight of a sea of penguins standing shoulder to shoulder. One of the largest Elephant seals haul-outs on the island is also here. In the early summer months, the beach seems carpeted by animals, an ever-changing labyrinth of massive gray forms and shapes. They growl and grunt while the wails and whimpers of fur seals fill the air from afar.
 
Stromness, South Georgia
The name Stromness is tied in history books to one of the greatest human endeavors of adversity and hope ever recorded. It was here that Sir Ernest Shackleton and his companions arrived in 1916 after an arduous 36-hour crossing of the island, traversing uncharted ice caps and treacherous mountain terrain, and finally reached this remote outpost of civilization.
Stromness Bay on the northern coast of South Georgia once housed a prominent whaling station. Established in 1907 as a site for a factory ship, it was enlarged in 1912 when the processing moved on shore. Buildings were constructed, and the population of the station dramatically increased. In 1961, it was abandoned to the mercy of the elements, and today the station’s ghostly appearance has given way to the forces of nature. Fur seals have reclaimed the bay and the occupy the ruins. Often, hundreds of fur seal pups only a few weeks old congregate on the beach and around the station, playing, fighting, hustling and running among the remnants of the abandoned equipment.

Sample Port Activities
VENTURES BY SEABOURN: KAYAK SOUTH GEORGIA
  • STARTING AT $295
Exciting, exhilarating, memorable -- welcome to Expedition Experiences by Seabourn. Zodiac, kayaking or hiking activities enable you to experience the wonders of nature up close; in-depth cultural, ethnographic and archaeological discoveries connect you to the human and natural history of Seabourn's world. Each Expedition is expertly planned, professionally operated, and escorted by skilled expedition staff.
Kayaking in South Georgia is an active way to explore this sub Antarctic Island in peace and tranquility. Your qualified guide will join you as you paddle with the mountains and glaciers of South Georgia in the background. While paddling around South Georgia, it is not uncommon for the "locals" to surround you out of curiosity. These include, but are not limited to; fur seals, king penguins, southern giant petrels and a variety of other wildlife. This truly is a once in a life time experience. As you can imagine, kayaking in South Georgia is highly weather-dependent. Your onboard expedition team will make every effort to offer this activity as often as conditions are safe and weather permits.
Please note: This tour operates weather permitting although rain is usually not a deterrent. As temperatures and weather conditions can vary, please dress in layers. A waterproof outer layer is provided in the fSouth Georgia may include the following experiences. The exact itinerary is subject to permissions, weather, ice conditions and time available. The daily program will be determined by the Expedition Team and is subject to site availability.
Cooper Bay, South Georgia
A wealth of wildlife and awe-inspiring scenery reward those who visit Cooper Bay, a hidden gem awaiting discovery at the southeastern-most extremity of South Georgia. Four species of penguins nest and breed at Cooper Bay, including the island’s largest chinstrap penguin colony, together with colonies of macaroni and gentoo penguins and a small number of king penguins.
While macaroni penguins are the most abundant species on South Georgia, with numbers estimated at ten million, they are usually extremely hard to find. Elsewhere, they nest on inaccessibly high cliffs and steep rocky slopes, making Cooper Bay one of the few easily accessible locations. Giant petrels and both light-mantled and sooty albatrosses find safe nesting sites among the waist-high tussock grass that covers the steep slopes above the bay. Masses of fur seals swarm the beaches and are often seen playing in the kelp beds offshore.
Cooper Bay was named after Robert Cooper, First Lieutenant of James Cook’s ship HMS Resolution that visited here in 1775.
 
Drygalski Fjord, South Georgia
Drygalski Fjord is one of the most scenic areas of South Georgia, and also one of the windiest. Its narrow, two-and-a-half mile (4 km) waterway is bordered by steep-sided rock walls crowned by spectacular snow-covered peaks rising to over a 3,200’ (1,000 m). At the head of the fjord looms the mass of the Risting Glacier. The sharply pointed ice pinnacles and deep blue crevasses of its massive face occasionally send huge blocks of ice thundering into the water.
Despite its impressive and seemingly inhospitable appearance, Drygalski Fjord supports a surprising amount of wildlife. This is the main breeding area in South Georgia for snow petrels. Blue-eyed shags, Wilson’s storm petrels, and Antarctic terns are common visitors, and the fjord is also the northernmost recorded breeding site for Weddell seals.
The fjord was named to honor Professor Eric Von Drygalski, leader of the First German Antarctic Expedition of 1901-03.
 
Fortuna Bay, South Georgia
Scenic Fortuna Bay offers both prolific wildlife viewing and a magnificent panorama from its beach of jagged summit peaks and the impressive expanse of the Konig Glacier. Named after the first whale-catcher to operate here in the early 1900s, Fortuna Bay was used by early explorers and sealers long before the establishment of whaling stations on South Georgia.
It boasts a large population of elephant and fur seals along its mile-and-a-half (2km) long pebble beach. Seal pups congregate here in huge numbers. The curious pups run to and fro, playing frisky games and exploring the world around them, resembling a chaotic animal kindergarten. The bay also supports a colony of several thousand photogenic king penguins, the largest on South Georgia.
The best-known human history of Fortuna Bay comes from the tribulations of Sir Ernest Shackleton. It was here that he and his companions descended to the bay in 1916, after a treacherous crossing of the island’s ice cap, to reach their rescuers at the Stromness Whaling Station.
 
Gold Harbour, South Georgia
Gold Harbour, its small, crescent cove framed by the glacier-covered peaks of the Salvesen Range, is regarded as one of the most beautiful areas in all of South Georgia. The prominent icefall of the Betrab Glacier hangs dramatically from the cliffs above, from time to time releasing a large ice block to fall thundering into the sea.
The highlight of a visit to Gold Harbour is the large colony of king penguins that covers the length of the beach. Raucous penguin calls fill the air with never-ending whistles and chatters as fluffy penguin chicks roam the beach in search of their parents. A small gentoo penguin colony has tucked itself in amongst the grass nearby. Massive elephant seals, weighing thousands of pounds, lounge at the water’s edge, while leopard seals lurk off the beach in hopes of a careless penguin. Above, light-mantled albatrosses glide along the cliff faces as giant petrels hover over the colony.
 
Grytviken, South Georgia
Tucked in at the head of King Edward Cove and encircled by steep rugged mountains is the capital of South Georgia, Grytviken. It was established by the Norwegian captain Carl Larsen in 1904 as the island’s first land-based whaling station, and its name literally means “Pot Bay” for the number of seal- oil try-pots left here by early sealers.
Over 300 people lived in Grytviken during its busiest years. Nowadays it resembles a ghost town strewn with the remnants of rusty oil tanks, oil processing plants and the skeletons of derelict whaling vessels. The house of the station manager has been restored to become the South Georgia Museum. The Lutheran church and the white crosses of the cemetery are restored to their former state and stand in stark contrast to the verdant green peaks above. A monument marks the grave of the heroic British explorer Sir Ernest Shackleton, affectionately known by his men as ‘the boss.’ Grytviken also has its own post office, selling unique South Georgia stamps, while across the cove is the British Scientific Station at King Edward Point.
 
Salisbury Plain, South Georgia
Salisbury Plain is a stunningly beautiful place to visit. It was deposited by retreating glaciers along the shore of the Bay of Isles, and resembles an open stage rimmed by a towering amphitheater of snow-capped mountains. Its name first appeared on British Admiralty charts in 1930 and likely refers to the similarly named feature back in England.
Salisbury Plain is home to the second largest king penguin colony on the island. It is immense in size and overwhelming in numbers, with over 250,000 birds nesting, breeding, and molting on its shores. Penguins are everywhere, dotting the beach and covering the adjacent hillsides. A cacophony of trumpeting and chirping adult penguins and whistling chicks fills the air against a rhythmic backdrop of the surf crashing on the beach.
One of South Georgia’s largest elephant seal populations also comes to haul out along this 1.8 mile (3 km) long pebble beach. Fur seals are here in great abundance, hustling between penguin congregations and clusters of massive elephant seals in a scene of controlled biological chaos!
 
South Georgia
Remote and forbidding South Georgia, the most rugged of all sub-Antarctic islands, digests the fury of the stormy Southern Seas. The island’s dramatic glacier-covered mountains rise sharply and are crowned by Mount Paget at 6,900’ (2935m). Some 50 percent of South Georgia is permanently covered by glaciers, nourished by the proximity of the Antarctic Circumpolar Current.
The cold, surrounding seas in this area the most nutrient-rich on earth, and make South Georgia a mecca for wildlife. Amidst the vastness of the Southern Ocean, it is a place of pilgrimage for penguins: a place to feed, to breed, and to rear young. Over 250,000 king penguins return to South Georgia annually, transforming its bays and beaches into a mosaic of motion and sound. Several other species of penguins, along with skuas, petrels, albatrosses, pipits and other birds nest along its shores. A few million fur seals hustle about like playful puppies, and hundreds of thousands of elephant seals gather in haul-outs so unimaginably immense they must be seen to be believed.
 
St Andrews Bay, South Georgia
Few places on earth are as immensely grand as St Andrews Bay. This is a place of such sheer vast scale that it must be truly experienced to be believed. Its wave-battered, windswept beaches border a broad plain left behind by retreating glaciers, their white snouts clearly visible at the base of the mountains.
The desolation left behind by the glaciers didn’t stay vacant for long. The void was filled by literally hundreds of thousands of king penguins, gathering in one of the largest colonies on earth. Take the time to climb onto the crest of the moraine view to the unforgettable sight of a sea of penguins standing shoulder to shoulder. One of the largest Elephant seals haul-outs on the island is also here. In the early summer months, the beach seems carpeted by animals, an ever-changing labyrinth of massive gray forms and shapes. They growl and grunt while the wails and whimpers of fur seals fill the air from afar.
 
Stromness, South Georgia
The name Stromness is tied in history books to one of the greatest human endeavors of adversity and hope ever recorded. It was here that Sir Ernest Shackleton and his companions arrived in 1916 after an arduous 36-hour crossing of the island, traversing uncharted ice caps and treacherous mountain terrain, and finally reached this remote outpost of civilization.
Stromness Bay on the northern coast of South Georgia once housed a prominent whaling station. Established in 1907 as a site for a factory ship, it was enlarged in 1912 when the processing moved on shore. Buildings were constructed, and the population of the station dramatically increased. In 1961, it was abandoned to the mercy of the elements, and today the station’s ghostly appearance has given way to the forces of nature. Fur seals have reclaimed the bay and the occupy the ruins. Often, hundreds of fur seal pups only a few weeks old congregate on the beach and around the station, playing, fighting, hustling and running among the remnants of the abandoned equipment.

Sample Port Activities
VENTURES BY SEABOURN: KAYAK SOUTH GEORGIA
  • STARTING AT $295
Exciting, exhilarating, memorable -- welcome to Expedition Experiences by Seabourn. Zodiac, kayaking or hiking activities enable you to experience the wonders of nature up close; in-depth cultural, ethnographic and archaeological discoveries connect you to the human and natural history of Seabourn's world. Each Expedition is expertly planned, professionally operated, and escorted by skilled expedition staff.
Kayaking in South Georgia is an active way to explore this sub Antarctic Island in peace and tranquility. Your qualified guide will join you as you paddle with the mountains and glaciers of South Georgia in the background. While paddling around South Georgia, it is not uncommon for the "locals" to surround you out of curiosity. These include, but are not limited to; fur seals, king penguins, southern giant petrels and a variety of other wildlife. This truly is a once in a life time experience. As you can imagine, kayaking in South Georgia is highly weather-dependent. Your onboard expedition team will make every effort to offer this activity as often as conditions are safe and weather permits.
Please note: This tour operates weather permitting although rain is usually not a deterrent. As temperatures and weather conditions can vary, please dress in layers. A waterproof outer layer is provided in the form of a dry suit. Pogie gloves are provided, along with booties and dry bags for your camera(s) or extra gear. Bring a hat or beanie, camera and binoculars and wear sunglasses and sunscreen. Please remove all rings, watches, bracelets and earrings. No prior kayaking experience is required. A briefing and instructions on how to paddle will be provided before your tour departs. All kayaks are doubles. Maximum weight per kayak (2 persons) is 617lbs or 280kg. Minimum height for participants is 150 cm (5 feet). Minimum age is 6 and guests under 18 must be accompanied by an adult.
orm of a dry suit. Pogie gloves are provided, along with booties and dry bags for your camera(s) or extra gear. Bring a hat or beanie, camera and binoculars and wear sunglasses and sunscreen. Please remove all rings, watches, bracelets and earrings. No prior kayaking experience is required. A briefing and instructions on how to paddle will be provided before your tour departs. All kayaks are doubles. Maximum weight per kayak (2 persons) is 617lbs or 280kg. Minimum height for participants is 150 cm (5 feet). Minimum age is 6 and guests under 18 must be accompanied by an adult.
 

Day 40-41: Days At Sea

  • Ship
  • 2 Breakfasts, 2 Lunches, 2 Dinners
Enjoy the cruise and avail of the activities and amenities on board. 

Day 42: Stanley/Falkland Is/Islas Malvinas

  • Ship
  • 1 Breakfast, 1 Lunch, 1 Dinner
There is nowhere else in the world like the Falkland Islands. The archipelago is a remote, wind-swept place of stunning landscapes, dazzling white sand beaches, magnificent wildlife, and a rather gregarious mix of people. Over 200 islands surround the two main islands of West and East Falkland. These isolated and treeless shores are home to an overwhelming abundance of birdlife: albatross, penguins, caracaras, geese, and many others. Perhaps it was the very remoteness of the islands; the allure of its barren landscapes, pure in their austerity and colorful in their details, and the immensely large open skies that attracted settlers to its shores long ago.
It has accumulated a wealth of maritime and military history.  More than three hundred shipwrecks litter its shores, while the stark white crosses of both British and Argentine soldiers stand as a silent reminder to the war of 1982. Numerous claims for the islands have been put forward in the course of their history. Nowadays the Falkland Islands are a self-governing British Overseas Territory.

The lonely lighthouse at Cape Pembroke welcomes arrivals to Stanley. It alerts ships to the treacherous rocks, reefs and shoals for which the Falkland Islands have long been known. With a population of over 2,000 people, Stanley is the largest settlement on the islands. Its gardens, tea rooms, brightly colored houses and hotels lend it a slightly Victorian feel, seemingly suspended in time. The Anglican Cathedral, the southernmost in the world, stands prominently on Stanley’s waterfront.

The Falklands’ unique abundance of wildlife is evident in Stanley. Dolphins visit its harbor, while steamer ducks, kelp gulls, and other birds abound on shore. Southern sea lions can be spotted basking in the sun. Southern giant petrels often fly through town, oblivious to the human presence. Founded in the 1840s, the town was named after Edward Smith-Stanley, Earl of Derby, who never visited the islands.

Day 43: New Island, Falkland Islands

  • Ship
  • 1 Breakfast, 1 Lunch, 1 Dinner
Wind-swept New Island, one of the world’s most remote inhabited islands, lies on the western fringe of the Falklands Archipelago. Its gentle, low-lying eastern shores are indented with white, sandy bays and coves beaming with turquoise water.  Gradually rising, these slopes are transformed into rugged sea-battered cliffs on the island’s western side. A place of colorful landscapes, New Island supports some of the largest concentrations and diversity of wildlife in the Falklands, with over forty species of nesting birds. Four species of penguins, including 13,000 gentoo and 26,000 Southern rockhopper penguins call the island home. Embracing winds and seas below, 60,000 black-browed albatross soar along the cliffs. 
New Island’s history is as rich and plentiful as its natural wonders. The island has known human presence since the late 1700s, especially with many whaling ships finding refuge in its coves and bays from tempestuous weather.

Day 44-45: Days At Sea

  • Ship
  • 2 Breakfasts, 2 Lunches, 2 Dinners
Enjoy the cruise and avail of the activities and amenities on board. 

Day 46: Montevideo, Uruguay

  • Ship
  • 1 Breakfast, 1 Lunch, 1 Dinner
Tucked in between Brazil and Argentina, the republic of Uruguay has nevertheless maintained its own identity and traditions. As South America's second smallest country, it has been called a city surrounded by a big ranch. Montevideo has also been referred to as "The Switzerland of South America," for its same secretive bank system guaranteed by law. Uruguay is principally middle class and boasts the most highly educated citizens on the continent.

Day 47: Buenos Aires, Argentina

  • Ship
  • 1 Breakfast, 1 Lunch, 1 Dinner
Referred to as the "Paris of South America", Buenos Aires is considered as one of the most livable cities in South America. Although the bustling capital city has just under 3,000,000 inhabitants and a population density of 13,680 inhabitants per square kilometer (34,800 per square mile), it was rated in 2018 as one of the top cities on the continent for its ‘quality of life’. Twinned with world cities such as Moscow and Miami, Buenos Aires displays through its architecture, a cultural past rooted in both the Old and New Worlds. A vibrancy for life can be seen everywhere. Crowded public markets, street performers dancing the tango, colorful graffiti-style street art, ultra-modern buildings, a dramatic skyline and a bustling port. Culturally, Buenos Aires has the busiest live theatre industry on Earth, outperforming New York, London and Paris. Every weekend, over 300 theatres are active with plays and productions.
Buenos Aires was founded in 1580 by Spanish explorer Juan de Garay, and has changed hands many times during its history.

Day 48: Punta Del Este, Uruguay

  • Ship
  • 1 Breakfast, 1 Lunch, 1 Dinner
Referred to as the "Riviera of South America," Punta del Este is first and foremost a world class beach resort. Located at the tip of a peninsula that juts out into the Atlantic, it is bordered on both sides by more than 25 miles of beaches with pounding, surf on the ocean side, and tranquil waters on the other. Fine white sand beaches connect azure waters to pine forests, where eucalyptus and mimosa trees lend their scent to the evening air.

Day 49-50: Days At Sea

  • Ship
  • 2 Breakfasts, 2 Lunches, 2 Dinners
Enjoy the cruise and avail of the activities and amenities on board. 

Day 51: Armacao Dos Buzios, Brazil

  • Ship
  • 1 Breakfast, 1 Lunch, 1 Dinner
Tucked into a protected cove along a golden beach, Ilha Grande’s main town is a sleepy place dedicated to laid-back leisure. The island’s earlier history as a notorious pirate den, a leper colony and the Brazilian equivalent of Devil’s Island is all but invisible today. Behind the waterfront street and the tidy church rise moderate peaks clad in virgin Atlantic rainforest. Ilha Grande is blessed with an abundance of superb beaches. There are no private cars on the island, so transport is either by foot on well-marked trails or by boat. It’s possible to walk along through the rainforest from beach to beach. Praia Lopes Mendes, which was named one of the world’s most beautiful by Vogue magazine, is a hike, but worth the walk or the fare for a boat. Adventureiro is the postcard beach, with large sea-smooth rocks lined up along the sand. The water is warm and clear at all of them, and at other coves such as Lagoa Azul, and snorkeling is easy and rewarding. It’s nice to know that all energy used on the island is generated from renewable sources.

Day 52-53: Rio De Janeiro, Brazil

  • Ship
  • 2 Breakfasts, 2 Lunches, 2 Dinners
One of the most distinctive and breathtaking harbors in the world is the port of Rio de Janeiro encrusting the south-facing shores of Guanabara Bay under the looming domes of Corcovado and Sugarloaf mountains. Few urban landscapes have been more photographed or more effusively praised than Rio’s unmistakable cityscape. Sugarloaf welcomes visitors arriving by sea, and invites them to dare the thrilling gondola ride on its cable-car access to enjoy panoramic views of the city and its signature beaches: Copacabana, Tijuca, Ipanema and Leblon. The city seems to pulse with the energy and impetus of its famous Carnavál Sambadrome parades, no matter when you visit. The city itself is inscribed by UNESCO as a World Heritage Site, defined as “Carioca Landscapes, Between the Mountain and the Sea.” Visitors are practically required to survey certain sites, including the Sugarloaf ascent, the Tijuca Rainforest Park, the towering statue of Christ the Redeemer atop Corcovado, and, for football fans, the Maracanä Stadium. The food, the music, the breathtaking scenery, and the joyous spirit of Rio will be among the most lasting memories of any traveler fortunate enough to visit.

Day 54: Armacao Dos Buzios, Brazil

  • Ship
  • 1 Breakfast, 1 Lunch, 1 Dinner
Buzios is on everyone’s top ten most beautiful places list. With dozens of gorgeous beaches, warm, clear waters, lush tropical vegetation and a wealth of opportunities for active or relaxing play, it earns the spot easily. The place thrives on pleasing visitors, and you’ll be no exception.

Day 55-56: Days At Sea

  • Ship
  • 2 Breakfasts, 2 Lunches, 2 Dinners
Enjoy the onboard activities and amenities. 

Day 57: Recife, Brazil

  • Ship
  • 1 Breakfast, 1 Lunch, 1 Dinner
Recife, meaning "reef," was named for the great natural mass of coral which lies off its coast. The city is made up of three sections: the mainland, the peninsula, and the island. Bridges of stone and iron connect the three. Founded by fishermen and sailors in the first half of the 16th century, the city grew rapidly along with the sugarcane and slave trades. The city continues to grow, and now skyscrapers are crowding out the beautiful colonial mansions of the sugar era. Today the city is known as a beach resort, and it is one of northeast Brazil's most popular tourist destinations.

Day 58: Natal, Brazil

  • Ship
  • 1 Breakfast, 1 Lunch, 1 Dinner
Natal was built on the right bank of the River Potenji, right where the river meets the Atlantic; the soil is very sandy, with dunes and bays protected by reefs which appear all along the shore line.  This "City of Dunes" invites you to ride in a dune buggy over the towering Jenipabu sand dunes with sweeping views of the sea. You can choose either a relaxing meander or a thrill-ride, and wear your bathing suit for a swim in the Pitangui Lagoon. Another option is an orientation to the Natal region starting with a visit to the 16th century Forte de Reis Magos, the founding structure of the town. One landmark moment will be a visit to Pirangi Beach to survey the world’s largest cashew tree. This leafed behemoth covers an area of 86,000 square feet, and produces a harvest of nearly 80,000 cashew nuts. 

Day 59-60: Days At Sea

  • Ship
  • 2 Breakfasts, 2 Lunches, 2 Dinners
Enjoy the cruise and avail of the activities and amenities on board. 

Day 61: Crossing The Equator

  • Ship
  • 1 Breakfast, 1 Lunch, 1 Dinner
If you are a “pollywog,” who has never crossed the line at sea, you will be expected to undergo a mock trial by King Neptune and his court for the entertainment of the “shellbacks” who have already done so. Mild but hilarious indignities will be conjured, and in the end a good time will be had by most, if not all.

Day 62: Cruising The Amazon River

  • Ship
  • 1 Breakfast, 1 Lunch, 1 Dinner
The Amazon is indisputably the largest river on earth by volume of discharge. At its mouth, its flow into the Atlantic Ocean is greater than the next seven largest rivers combined. Whether it is the world’s longest river is a matter of dispute among geographers, but most finally concede it may rank second to the Nile in length. It is between 110 and 180 miles wide at its mouth, again depending on which measurement you accept. Your voyage will navigate the river something like 1,000 miles from the sea. During some of that time, the river will be effectively a flowing ocean. Other times you will see one or the other of its banks. You will pass large numbers of vessels of all sorts and sizes, coming and going between the Amazon basin and the wider world. That basin covers 40 percent of South America and contains one third of all known living species. The river itself supports over 5,600 species of fish alone. Although it flows through Brazil, it is in many ways a country unto itself, with a unique, or rather many unique lifestyles and cultures. The life along the shores, both human and otherwise, is profoundly affected by the river’s ever-changing cycles of drought and flood. There is a lot to learn about the Amazon. Enjoy your journey along its fascinating shores.

Day 63: Santarem, Brazil

  • Ship
  • 1 Breakfast, 1 Lunch, 1 Dinner
Santarem is a busy port for the trade flowing up and down the Amazon between the Atlantic and the inland forests. The most famous site for visitors is the “Wedding of the Waters” where the clear, dark Tapajos River meets the muddy ochre Amazon. Due to their different densities, they flow alongside each other for quite some distance, between the same banks. Local boats specialize in taking visitors to the site. Local markets are fun to explore, and other excursions include visiting the smaller tributaries and forests, and fishing for the infamous piranha fish.

Day 64: Cruising The Amazon River

  • Ship
  • 1 Breakfast, 1 Lunch, 1 Dinner
The Amazon is indisputably the largest river on earth by volume of discharge. At its mouth, its flow into the Atlantic Ocean is greater than the next seven largest rivers combined. Whether it is the world’s longest river is a matter of dispute among geographers, but most finally concede it may rank second to the Nile in length. It is between 110 and 180 miles wide at its mouth, again depending on which measurement you accept. Your voyage will navigate the river something like 1,000 miles from the sea. During some of that time, the river will be effectively a flowing ocean. Other times you will see one or the other of its banks. You will pass large numbers of vessels of all sorts and sizes, coming and going between the Amazon basin and the wider world. That basin covers 40 percent of South America and contains one third of all known living species. The river itself supports over 5,600 species of fish alone. Although it flows through Brazil, it is in many ways a country unto itself, with a unique, or rather many unique lifestyles and cultures. The life along the shores, both human and otherwise, is profoundly affected by the river’s ever-changing cycles of drought and flood. There is a lot to learn about the Amazon. Enjoy your journey along its fascinating shores.

Day 65-66: Manaus, Brazil

  • Ship
  • 2 Breakfasts, 2 Lunches, 2 Dinners
The largest city on the Amazon and the main port for export and import on the river. It is actually located on the Rio Negro a few miles from where it meets the Rio Solimoes to form the Amazon at the famous Meeting of the Waters. The Teatro Amazonas is an Italian Renaissance Opera House constructed of imported materials, which hosted world-famous artists at the height of the rubber boom.

Day 67: Boca Dos Botos, Brazil /Parintins, Brazil

  • Ship
  • 1 Breakfast, 1 Lunch, 1 Dinner
The name of this spot along the Amazon refers in Portuguese to Botos, the famous pink dolphins native to this river. Time-honored Caboclo legend has it that these graceful, intelligent creatures possess the ability to transform themselves at night into handsome young men, who court and seduce the unsuspecting maidens of the riverside villages. It is just one example of the ways all living things here are entwined with the river and its fluctuations. At Boca dos Botos, your Ventures by Seabourn expedition team provides opportunities to visit a “flooded forest,” resulting from the dramatic seasonal change from dry ground to river bottom. The flora and fauna of the region are perfectly adapted to, and in fact dependent on this cycle. As you explore the area, you are likely to see animals such as sloths, howler monkeys, squirrel monkeys and colorful birds in activities they pursue during this sub-aquatic part of their invisible calendar.

At this river town on the Amazon, there is a center that illustrates the history of mankind, both indigenous and immigrant, in the Amazonia region. 

Day 68: Alter Do Chao, Brazil

  • Ship
  • 1 Breakfast, 1 Lunch, 1 Dinner
Alter do Chão On the banks of the Amazon tributary Tapajos River not far from Santarém, this town is known for the white sand beaches on Ilha do Amor just offshore that invite swimming and relaxing. It is also adjacent to the Lago Verde, a lagoon with plentiful wildlife, fish and vegetation that invites exploring by kayak, Zodiac or local boats, which can also take you to isolated Caboclo villages to investigate the lifestyle of these river folk. It also boasts a lovely church and one of the best art stores in the Amazon. Dolphins, pink and gray, often gather at the nearby Ponta da Cururu in the afternoon.

Day 69: Guajara, Brazil

  • Ship
  • 1 Breakfast, 1 Lunch, 1 Dinner
An optional opportunity to join the naturalists among your onboard Ventures by Seabourn expedition team on a zodiac adventure exploring the banks of the Guajara River -- a tributary of the Amazon. At riverside buffalo farms, take advantage of the chance to interact with the 'caboclos' - the people who have adapted to living and working in close association with the river, and to learn about their lifestyle. As you pass through an area of gallery forest, keep an eye out for some of the many colorful tropical bird species that inhabit the region, as well as reptiles and mammals that may be glimpsed either in the trees or on the banks. The elusive pink river dolphins called 'botos’ frequent this area as well. Caboclo legend maintains that the dolphins possess the capability to transform themselves into handsome young men at night, and seduce unwary maidens living in the riverside communities. 

Day 70: Days At Sea

  • Ship
  • 1 Breakfast, 1 Lunch, 1 Dinner
Enjoy the cruise and avail of the activities and amenities on board. 

Day 71: Devils Island, French Guiana

  • Ship
  • 1 Breakfast, 1 Lunch, 1 Dinner
Before they were a notorious penal colony, the Iles de Salut (Islands of Salvation) provided French colonists with a welcome escape from the fever-ridden jungles of the Guiana mainland. Lying ten miles off the coastline, and swept by treacherous ocean currents, the trio of small islands provided a perfect isolated location for incarcerating criminals without danger or expense, since the shark-infested sea and the trackless jungles ashore precluded any possibility of escape. All three islands, popularly known as Devil's Island, were used as a prison from 1852 to 1953. Your day is free to explore the prison ruins or search for signs of the surprisingly abundant wildlife.

Day 72: Days At Sea

  • Ship
  • 1 Breakfast, 1 Lunch, 1 Dinner
Enjoy the cruise and avail of the activities and amenities on board. 

Day 73: Bridgetown, Barbados

  • Ship
  • 1 Breakfast, 1 Lunch, 1 Dinner
Bridgetown, a UNESCO World Heritage Site, is an elegant capital city proudly displaying its 400 years of British heritage. Although, originally settled by Amerindian peoples 1,500 years ago, in the 17th century Barbados became one of the largest and most successful sugarcane producing areas in the world. At one point in time the income from sugar outweighed that of all the other British colonies combined. A stroll through town will guide you through Bridgetown’s history, to the statue of Admiral Horatio Nelson, past the Parliament Buildings, St Michaels Cathedral, St Mary’s church, Jubilee Gardens and eventually over Chamberlain Bridge. A picturesque seaside boardwalk will lead you to one of the many exceptional shoreline cafes and restaurants. One thousand year old Baobab trees in Queen’s Park, the largest in the Caribbean, stand as silent witnesses to past life here. Lounge on a serene beach, explore a plantation, discover sea turtles and even sample one of the islands renowned rhum distilleries.

Day 74: Fort-De-France, Martinique

  • Ship
  • 1 Breakfast, 1 Lunch, 1 Dinner
Fort-de-France, Martinique's capital, with its narrow streets and iron grill-worked balconies, brings to mind New Orleans or Nice. This distinctly French island is a full-fledged department of France, with members in parliament and the senate. Naturally, everyone speaks French, as well as a rapid-fire Creole. The island features a varied landscape, from quiet beaches to lush rain forest to imposing Mont Pelee. Not surprisingly, the shopping in Fort-de-France has a decidedly Gallic flair. Bienvenue to this bit of France in the Caribbean.

Day 75: St. Johns, Antigua And Barbuda

  • Ship
  • 1 Breakfast, 1 Lunch, 1 Dinner
Antigua is blessed with an abundance of shining white beaches, and many of these have sprouted top-end resort hotels that engender golf courses and other amenities counted among the best in the Caribbean. A pleasant drive up through farms and tiny villages leads to the commanding fortress on Shirley Heights, from which you can survey the town and the harbor of Nelson’s Dockyard across the island. Once a carenage for British frigates, today it is an enclave of shops and restaurants.

Day 76: Carambola Beach, Saint Kitts And Nevis

  • Ship
  • 1 Breakfast, 1 Lunch, 1 Dinner
A classic golden arc of sugary sand at South Friar’s Bay, Carambola is home to the island’s most luxurious beach clubs and restaurants. Umbrellas, loungers and optional water sports abound for those so inclined. Otherwise St. Kitts has other attractions, including a number of lovingly preserved plantation great houses, the UNESCO World Heritage Site of Brimstone Hill Fortress and a scenic narrow gauge sugarcane railway. 

Day 77: San Juan, Puerto Rico

  • Ship
  • 1 Breakfast, 1 Lunch, 1 Dinner
Puerto Rico has been voluntarily associated with the United States since it was ceded by Spain in 1898. In 1952, this island country became a self-governing commonwealth territory of the United States. The capital, San Juan, is a teeming city of over 1.5 million. Remnants of colonial architecture stand side by side with the most modern high rises in this city of contrasts. The 7-square-block area, which contains the historic zone of Old San Juan, was once completely encircled by city walls and is still guarded by the impressive forts of El Morro and San Cristobal, which loom over the harbor as reminders of the centuries of Spanish rule. El Yunque rainforest, on the northeastern side of the island, is just one of many distinctive geographical features found here. Mountain lakes, waterfalls, teak forests, and three magnificent phosphorescent bays offer the visitor a variety of diversions.

Day 78-79: Days At Sea

  • Ship
  • 2 Breakfasts, 2 Lunches, 2 Dinners
Enjoy the cruise and avail of the activities and amenities on board. 

Day 80: Miami, Florida, US | Disembark

  • 1 Breakfast
Miami is the busiest cruise port in the world, hosting a myriad of ships year-round from all over the globe. Although it is technically not on the Caribbean Sea, no other American city exudes more of the diverse tropical appeal of the Caribbean. The city is home to a large and vibrant immigrant population that blends snowbird refugees from more northern climes with emigres from all Latin America and the Caribbean, as well as sizable groups from Europe, the Middle East and Asia. From the hot-blooded Art Deco haunts of South Beach to the natural wonders of the UNESCO-inscribed Everglades and the laid-back charms of the Keys, South Florida offers a bounty of appealing attractions that make an extended stay in the region nearly mandatory for those either embarking or disembarking here. 

Ship/Hotel

Seabourn Quest

The Seabourn Quest
Dining Area at the Seabourn Quest
Event at the viewing deck of the Quest

Dates & Prices

My Preferred Start Date

Per person starting at
$40,499
Ocean View Suite at the Seabourn QuestOcean View Suite at the Seabourn Quest
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Ocean View Suite(OS)
Approximately 295 square feet (28 square meters) of inside space All Ocean View Suites features: A large picture window Comfortable living area Queen-size bed or two twin beds Dining table for two Walk-in closet An interactive flat-screen television with music and movies Fully stocked bar and refrigerator Makeup vanity, spacious bathroom with separate tub and shower *Wheelchair-accessible suites are roll-in showers only.
Ocean View Suite at the Seabourn QuestOcean View Suite at the Seabourn Quest
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Ocean View Suite (A)
Approximately 295 square feet (28 square meters) of inside space Guaranteed Suite: For this option, we select the location and specific suite for you, and notify you prior to departure. Guests are guaranteed to be assigned a suite in the category selected or higher. All Ocean View Suites features: A large picture window Comfortable living area Queen-size bed or two twin beds Dining table for two Walk-in closet An interactive flat-screen television with music and movies Fully stocked bar and refrigerator Makeup vanity, spacious bathroom with separate tub and shower *Wheelchair-accessible suites are roll-in showers only.
Ocean View Suite at the Seabourn QuestOcean View Suite at the Seabourn Quest
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Ocean View Suite (A1)
Located on Deck 4; Approximately 295 square feet (28 square meters) of inside space All Ocean View Suites features: A large picture window Comfortable living area Queen-size bed or two twin beds Dining table for two Walk-in closet An interactive flat-screen television with music and movies Fully stocked bar and refrigerator Makeup vanity, spacious bathroom with separate tub and shower
Veranda Suite at Seabourn QuestVeranda Suite at Seabourn Quest
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Veranda Suite (OB)
Located on Deck 4; Approximately 295 square feet (28 square meters) of inside space All Ocean View Suites features: A large picture window Comfortable living area Queen-size bed or two twin beds Dining table for two Walk-in closet Interactive flat-screen television with music and movies Fully stocked bar and refrigerator Makeup vanity, spacious bathroom with separate tub and shower All Veranda Suites feature A full-length window Glassdoor to a private veranda Comfortable living area Queen-size bed or two twin beds Dining table for two Walk-in closet An interactive flat-screen television with music and movies Fully stocked bar and refrigerator Makeup vanity Spacious bathroom with separate tub and shower *Wheelchair-accessible suites are roll-in showers only.
Veranda Suite at Seabourn QuestVeranda Suite at Seabourn Quest
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Veranda Suite (V1)
Located on Deck 5 and 6; Approximately 300 square feet (28 square meters) of inside space, plus one veranda of 65 square feet (6 square meters) All Veranda Suites feature: A full-length window Glassdoor to a private veranda Comfortable living area Queen-size bed or two twin beds Dining table for two Walk-in closet An interactive flat-screen television with music and movies Fully stocked bar and refrigerator Makeup vanity, spacious bathroom with shower. *The veranda railings in categories V1 and V2 are part metal and part glass from floor to teak rail.
Veranda Suite at Seabourn QuestVeranda Suite at Seabourn Quest
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Veranda Suite (V2)
Located on Deck 5 and 6; Approximately 300 square feet (28 square meters) of inside space, plus one veranda of 65 square feet (6 square meters) All Veranda Suites features: A full-length window Glassdoor to a private veranda Comfortable living area Queen-size bed or two twin beds Dining table for two Walk-in closet An interactive flat-screen television with music and movies Fully stocked bar and refrigerator Makeup vanity, spacious bathroom with shower. *The veranda railings in categories V1 and V2 are part metal and part glass from floor to teak rail.
Veranda Suite at Seabourn QuestVeranda Suite at Seabourn Quest
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Veranda Suite (V3)
Located on Deck 5 and 6; Approximately 300 square feet (28 square meters) of inside space, plus one veranda of 65 square feet (6 square meters) All Veranda Suites features: A full-length window Glassdoor to a private veranda Comfortable living area Queen-size bed or two twin beds Dining table for two Walk-in closet An interactive flat-screen television with music and movies Fully stocked bar and refrigerator Makeup vanity, spacious bathroom with shower. *The veranda railings in categories V1 and V2 are part metal and part glass from floor to teak rail.
Veranda Suite at Seabourn QuestVeranda Suite at Seabourn Quest
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Veranda Suite (V4)
Located on Deck 5 and 6; Approximately 300 square feet (28 square meters) of inside space, plus one veranda of 65 square feet (6 square meters) All Veranda Suites features: A full-length window Glassdoor to a private veranda Comfortable living area Queen-size bed or two twin beds Dining table for two Walk-in closet Interactive flat-screen television with music and movies Fully stocked bar and refrigerator Makeup vanity, spacious bathroom with shower. *The veranda railings in categories V1 and V2 are part metal and part glass from floor to teak rail.
Penthouse Suite at the Seabourn QuestPenthouse Suite at the Seabourn Quest
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Penthouse Suite Guarantee (PG)
Approximately 436 square feet (41 square meters) of inside space, plus one veranda of 98 square feet (9 square meters) All Penthouse Suite feature Dining table for two to four Separate bedroom Glassdoor to veranda Two flat-screen TVs Fully stocked bar Spacious bathroom with tub, shower, and large vanity
Penthouse Suite at the Seabourn QuestPenthouse Suite at the Seabourn Quest
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Penthouse Suite (PH)
Approximately 436 square feet (41 square meters) of inside space, plus one veranda of 98 square feet (9 square meters) All Penthouse Suite feature Dining table for two to four Separate bedroom Glassdoor to veranda Two flat-screen TVs Fully stocked bar Spacious bathroom with tub, shower, and large vanity
Penthouse Spa Suite at the Seabourn QuestPenthouse Spa Suite at the Seabourn Quest
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Penthouse Spa Suite (PS)
Approximately 536 to 539 square feet (50 square meters) of inside space, plus one veranda of 167 to 200 square feet (16 to 19 square meters) All Penthouse Spa Suite features: Dining table for two to four Separate bedroom Glassdoor to veranda Two flat-screen TVs Fully stocked bar Spacious bathroom with tub, shower, and large vanity
Owners Suite at the Seabourn QuestOwners Suite at the Seabourn Quest
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Owners Suite (O1)
Approximately 526 & 593 square feet (49 to 55 square meters) of inside space, plus one veranda of 133 & 354 square feet (12 to 33 square meters) Owner's Suites feature Expansive ocean views Forward-facing windows Dining for four to six Bathroom with whirlpool bathtub Guest bath Pantry with wet bar Two flat-screen TVs Complimentary Internet/Wi-Fi service
Owners Suite at the Seabourn QuestOwners Suite at the Seabourn Quest
Select a Date
Owners Suite (O2)
Approximately 526 & 593 square feet (49 to 55 square meters) of inside space, plus one veranda of 133 & 354 square feet (12 to 33 square meters) Owner's Suites feature Expansive ocean views Forward-facing windows Dining for four to six Bathroom with whirlpool bathtub Guest bath Pantry with wet bar Two flat-screen TVs Complimentary Internet/Wi-Fi service
Signature Suite at Seabourne QuestSignature Suite at Seabourne Quest
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Signature Suite (SS)
Approximately 859 square feet (80 square meters) of inside space, plus one veranda of 493 square feet (46 square meters) Signature Suites feature: Expansive ocean views Forward-facing windows Dining for four to six Bathroom with whirlpool bathtub Guest bath Pantry with wet bar Two flat-screen TVs Complimentary Internet/Wi-Fi service
Wintergarden Suite at Seabourne QuestWintergarden Suite at Seabourne Quest
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Wintergarden Suite (WG)
Approximately 914 square feet (85 square meters) of inside space, one veranda of 183 sq. ft. (17 square meters.). Wintergarden Suites feature: Large windows Dining for six Whirlpool bathtub Guest bath Convertible sofa bed for one Pantry with wet bar Glass-enclosed solarium with tub and day bed Two closets Two flat-screen TVs Complimentary Internet/Wi-Fi service
Wintergarden Suite at Seabourne QuestWintergarden Suite at Seabourne Quest
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Grand Wintergarden Suite (GR)
Approximately 1189 square feet (110 square meters) of inside space, plus two verandas totaling 214 square feet (20 square meters) Grand Wintergarden Suites feature Large windows Dining for six Glass-enclosed solarium with tub and day bed Bathroom with whirlpool bathtub Guest bath Two bedrooms Convertible sofa bed for one Pantry with wet bar Two flat-screen TVs Complimentary Internet/Wi-Fi service
Included
  • 80 Breakfasts, 78 Lunches, 78 Dinners
  • 79 Nights Accommodations
  • Accommodations as listed
  • Ground transportation as listed
  • Excursions and activities as listed
  • Meals as listed
  • Unlimited Free Wifi
  • Complimentary fine wines at lunch and dinner, and open bars throughout the ship
  • Complimentary marina and water sports equipment including a wide variety of aquatic toys (water skis, wakeboards, kayaks, jet skis, snorkeling equipment) based on destination's local rules and regulations and the discretion of the Captain due to weather and sea conditions
  • In-suite bar and refrigerator stocked with your preferences
  • All dining venues are complimentary
  • Personal Suite Host and Suite Attendant 
Excluded
  • Gratuities
  • Travel Insurance
  • Personal Expenses
  • Flight costs (please request a quote)
  • Additional excursions during free time
  • Fuel and transportation surcharges (when applicable)

Map

When to Go

Jan
Feb
Mar
Apr
May
Jun
Jul
Aug
Sep
Oct
Nov
Dec
Good to ideal period to travel, and many people choose to visit at this time.

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This was my first experience with Adventure Life - and I couldn't have been more pleased with the trip. The guides and local staff in both Buenos Aires and Uruguay were terrific - extremely helpful and accommodating. I really enjoyed meeting the friendly staff in Buenos Aires in person (I left my bags with them for the afternoon).
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