Have questions? We're here.
Stunning landscapes in Prince Christian Sound

Glaciers, Fjords & Indigenous Cultures

Reykjavik Roundtrip - Example 15 Day Cruise aboard Seabourn Venture
Talk with an expert
Build your ideal Arctic trip. Call 1.406.541.2677
Start Planning My Trip
Discover the rugged beauty and remote wilderness of Greenland aboard Seabourn Venture on this 15-day cruise. Begin the adventure in the picturesque town of Sisimiut, known for its rough, real, and remote atmosphere. Throughout the trip, be enchanted by Greenland's unique landscapes, featuring impressive glaciers and deep-cut fjords that weave a tale of ancient geological forces. Sail through Tunulliarfik Fjord and marvel at the majestic Prince Christian Sound. Immerse in Greenland's unique landscapes, from impressive glaciers and deep-cut fjords to vast, unspoiled terrains.

 
Rugged mountains of GreenlandStunning landscapes in Prince Christian Sound
Highlights
  • Exploring the ruins of the Norse settlements in Eastern Greenland
  • Visit Sermilik Fjord, breathtaking icebergs and glaciers in Greenland.
  • Discover the town of Sisimiut, its vibrant houses and Mount Nasaasaaq
  • Exploring the ancient Eastern Settlement and the UNESCO World Heritage
Places Visited
Activity Level: Relaxed
Involves minimal physical effort and is typically associated with leisurely activities. Activities are low-intensity or last less than a few hours each day.
0

Full Itinerary

Expand All

Day 1: Reykjavik, Iceland | Embark

Reykjavík, established by Viking settler Ingólfur Arnarson around 870 C.E., marks the location of the first permanent settlement in Iceland. The census of 1703 recorded that the city had 69 residents and consisted of a farm and a church. The impressive statue of Leif Erikson, in the center of town, reminds all of Iceland’s Viking heritage. The city's name translates to ‘smoky bay’, due to the geothermal nature of the surrounding area.

Today, about 200,000 people live in the Icelandic capital, roughly 60% of the country’s population. It has evolved into a sophisticated city. The northernmost national capital in the world is also one of the cleanest, greenest, and safest on Earth. Walking its streets, one will find rich culture, history, music, shopping, and vibrant nightlife in the late hours. Colorful rooftops and the elegant spire of Hallgrímskirkja Church dominate the city’s skyline. Known for its arts, the city hosts several internationally recognized festivals, notably the Iceland Air music festival, Arts Festival, and the International Film Festival.


 

Day 2: Heimaey, Westman Islands, Iceland

  • Ship
  • 1 Breakfast, 1 Lunch, 1 Dinner
Heimaey Island is the largest in the Westman Islands located four miles off the south-west coast of Iceland. One of the most visually impressive islands in Iceland, it is ringed by tall, vertical sea cliffs many hundreds of feet high. It is also the home to over eight million Atlantic puffins, more nesting puffins than anywhere else on earth. A local story tells that puffin chicks, taking their first flights at night, often become stranded in the village streets, where the local children rescue them and set them free the next day.

In January of 1973, the island received the nickname, ‘Pompeii of the North’ when a volcanic eruption and lava flow destroyed half the town. This caused a crisis when the town’s only harbor was nearly blocked by advancing lava. Nowadays, it is a lively place with a vibrant culture and over four thousand residents. Archaeological excavations suggest that people lived on Heimaey as early as the 10th Century.

Day 3: Days At Sea

  • Ship
  • 1 Breakfast, 1 Lunch, 1 Dinner
Sailing the vast and open waters, the horizon stretches endlessly. The ship's deck provides breathtaking views of the ocean, offering an immersive experience with the surrounding maritime beauty.

Day 4: Sermilik Fjord

  • Ship
  • 1 Breakfast, 1 Lunch, 1 Dinner
Sermilik Fjord in southeastern Greenland cuts from the Denmark Strait into King Christian IX Land between Kitak Island and Cape Tycho Brahe, near the town of Tasiilaq. The fjord's name means ‘place with glaciers’ in Greenlandic, and it culminates in multiple glaciers, including Helheim, Fenris, and Midgard glaciers, which feed a steady flow of icebergs into the fjord. Surrounded by a steep mountainous shoreline and filled with sculpted icebergs, it makes a spectacular setting.

Fridtjof Nansen hoped the fjord might offer a route to the icecap for his 1888 expedition to cross the island. But the attempt to enter the fjord was thwarted by the outflow of ice, which pushed the team hundreds of miles southward before managing to land. Eventually, they did cross from Umivik Bay to Godthab.

Day 5: Umivik Bay, Greenland

  • Ship
  • 1 Breakfast, 1 Lunch, 1 Dinner
On the King Frederick VI Coast of Greenland’s southeast quadrant, the semi-circular Umivik Bay is carved out just north of the Denmark Strait. Unlike the sheer cliffs and rugged terrain presented by much of the coastline, the shores inside the bay are smooth and the massive Greenland Ice Sheet comes right down to the shore in undulating slopes. This profile persuaded Fritjof Nansen to select the bay as the starting point of his successful 1888 expedition to cross Greenland over the ice sheet. There are several large islands in the bay, including Uppernattivik Island smack in the middle. There are calving glaciers to survey and a landing is possible here as well.

Day 6: Skjoldungen Fjord, Greenland

  • Ship
  • 1 Breakfast, 1 Lunch, 1 Dinner
Imagine a narrow fjord bordered by rugged peaks, vertical rock walls, and serpentine rivers of ice plunging into the sea. This is Skjoldungen Fjord, named by Wilhelm August Graah after the honorific title Skjoldungen which, according to Norse mythology, was given to successors of legendary King Skjold to the Danish throne.

Numerous tidewater glaciers calve during the summer, releasing large chunks of ice that plunge into the fjord. Above, huge crevasses and free-standing pillars of ice, known as seracs, are silhouetted against a blue Greenlandic sky. Barren of large trees, Skjoldungen Fjord is carpeted in colorful dwarf birch and willow forests that may grow several feet high, as well as a variety of low-growing Arctic wildflowers.

This fjord was likely inhabited by Paleo-Eskimo (Inuit) nomadic people as early as 4,000 years ago. Archaeological remains of later historical periods, such as Thule culture graves, have also been found, indicating that Inuit people have lived in the area continuously. Scattered within this stunning scenery are remains of more recent abandoned Inuit dwellings along the fjord’s western shores.

Day 7: Cruising Prince Christian Sound | Aappilattoq, Greenland

  • Ship
  • 1 Breakfast, 1 Lunch, 1 Dinner
The transit of the Prince Christian Sound is one of the highlights of cruising in Greenland. The approximately 60-mile sound cuts between the mainland and an archipelago of islands from east to west, under the southern edge of the massive Greenland Ice Sheet, which covers 80 percent of the island. The sound is narrow, sometimes as little as 1500 feet across, and numerous glaciers reach the sea on its shores, calving icebergs into the sound. High, barren and sharply defined peaks tower on both sides. The only indications of humanity to be seen are the Ikerassasuaq weather station (using the Greenlandic name for the sound) where the ship enters, and the small village of Appilattoq, housing approximately 100 people. Animal life is more abundant, with minke, fin and blue whales seen frequently, as well as ringed and bearded seals that haul out on the floating ice. It is a breathtaking display of natural splendor in the severe, rugged vernacular of rock, ice and sea that is unique to the arctic realm. ​

Tiny Aappilattoq is located in the Prince Christian Sound at Greenland’s southern tip, in the municipality of Kullaleq. Its name means ‘red’ in Greenlandic. The sound is enfolded by steep, unglaciated mountains, rising sheer from the water to sharp, shattered peaks. The town’s setting is particularly picturesque, its brightly painted houses scattered across a small peninsula of humped granite domes, under a backdrop of a looming pyramid of stone. The little red town church nestles next to a white-picketed graveyard. The sound itself is dotted with icebergs slowly melting into expressionist sculptures. It is a place where the infrequent visitors routinely fill their camera cards with unforgettable images of Greenland’s spectacular visual splendor.

Day 8: Qaqortoq |Hvalsey, Greenland

  • Ship
  • 1 Breakfast, 1 Lunch, 1 Dinner
Qaqortoq is the largest city in Southern Greenland with 3,300 inhabitants. Founded in 1775 by trader Anders Olsen, it overlooks a small-boat harbor with fish, shrimp, and fur processing plants. The town is famous for its open-air art exhibition called the Stone & Man project, featuring over 40 stone sculptures celebrating Greenlandic culture. Other attractions include Mindebrønden, Greenland's oldest fountain, the Qaqortoq Museum, The Saviors Lutheran Church, and the Viking church remains of Hvalsey, representing the last record of the Greenlandic Norse from A.D. 1408.

Located twelve miles up the Hvalseyjarfjord from Qaqortoq, the largest community in South Greenland, lies the most prominent Norse archaeological site in Greenland. Known as the Eastern Settlement, it thrived from the 10th to the mid-15th century. The ruins of great halls and a church at Hvalsey hint at a prosperous medieval farmstead. The Norse traded with the indigenous Thule people for furs and ivory, valuable commodities in Europe. A wedding in the church in 1408 marks the last written record of the Norse presence in Greenland. As immigrants returned to established communities in Iceland and Norway, Hvalsey and other Norse settlements dwindled. The site's meadows of wildflowers evoke the peaceful community that once existed there.

Day 9: Narssaq | Tugtutok, Greenland

  • Ship
  • 1 Breakfast, 1 Lunch, 1 Dinner
Erik the Red chose the fjords in the area of Narssaq for his Viking settlements in western Greenland due to their relatively warm climate. The region holds the ruins of several Norse settlements, including Dyrnæs Church and the Landnamsgaarden homestead dating back to A.D. 1000, making them some of the oldest Norse ruins in Greenland. Presently, around 1,500 people reside in Narssaq, with many continuing the tradition of sheep farming on the arable land north of town. The town itself was founded in 1830 and boasts an excellent museum showcasing exhibits on local Greenlandic technology, the kayak, and Norse settlement

This long island located on the west (Baffin Sea) coast of Greenland has fascinating attractions that are both geologic and archaeological. The island reveals some intriguing glimpses of eroded dykes in rock with mixed igneous and sedimentary content. It also provides opportunities to explore archaeological sites with ancient Thule and more recent Inuit house structures and other evidence. Expedition team experts will share their passion for, and their insights into these marvels of the long and eventful geological and human history of Greenland..

Day 10: Brattahlid (Qassiarsuk) | Itilleq, Tunulliarfik Fjord, Greenland

  • Ship
  • 1 Breakfast, 1 Lunch, 1 Dinner
In the year A.D. 985 infamous Viking explorer Eric the Red sailed into Eriksfjord. It was here at Brattahlíð that he established his private estate. Some 5,000 Viking settlers eventually followed him to populate an area that became known as the Eastern Settlement. Under 100 people live here today, making their living by farming sheep just as the Norse did 1,150 years earlier. Renamed Qassiarsuk the pastoral village boasts the oldest church built in the Americas. Today a living history museum, the tiny sod-roofed church is complete with curators dressed in period clothing of the Viking era. Numerous Norse ruins can be found here, including a recently unearthed graveyard containing the remains of 144 Viking colonists. Proudly overlooking the village, is the remarkable bronze statue of Erik the Red.

Tunulliarfik Fjord in southwest Greenland, formerly known as Eiriksfjord, attracted early Norse settlers due to its temperate climate and fertile farmland. It is located in the heart of the ancient Eastern Settlement and the UNESCO World Heritage-designated Kujataa landscape. The fjord is home to the small Inuit village of Igaliku, where sheep outnumber the residents, and it serves as a base for exploring the archaeological site of Gardar, the former archdiocese and religious center of 12th-century Viking Greenland.

Seabourn guests travel to Tunulliarfik Fjord via Zodiacs, landing near Igaliku and hiking two miles along the Kongevejen (Path of the Kings) to explore the ruins of the red sandstone cathedral dedicated to Saint Nicholas, the patron saint of sailors. Optional kayak excursions along the scenic coastline are also available, weather permitting.

Day 11: Paamiut (Frederikshab), Greenland

  • Ship
  • 1 Breakfast, 1 Lunch, 1 Dinner
The small town of Paamuit and its 1,600 inhabitants are off the beaten track of Greenlandic tourism. This is remote Greenland at its best. As you walk through town it isn’t unusual to find seal meat and seal skins drying on racks under houses. People have lived here since 1,500 B.C.E. After the arrival of the Danes in 1742, the community prospered by trading furs and whale products and became known for its soapstone carvings. Today, the sea remains ice-free during the winter, providing inhabitants with year-round fishing. The town itself is a multitude of brightly colored buildings. Fredens Kirke is a simple but elegant Lutheran church located in the center of town. The unadorned white crosses of the adjacent graveyard contrast the green roof, red walls, and golden trim of the church.

The white-tailed eagle, known as Nattoralik in Greenlandic, is plentiful in the region. Good luck is said to come to anyone who sees it. Locals often name their youth football teams Nattoralik.

Day 12: Nuuk (Godthab), Greenland

  • Ship
  • 1 Breakfast, 1 Lunch, 1 Dinner
Greenland’s capital Nuuk, is a city of vitality and Greenlandic culture. It’s here that old traditions and modern influences combine to create a diverse population. Nuuk is the home of the University of Greenland with its 650 students and the Greenland National Museum with is its extensive historical archives and cultural displays. Also of interest are the Nuuk Art Museum and the Kayak Museum. The Art Museum holds a body of 300 paintings primarily featuring the work of traveling European artists, while the Kayak Museum houses a very impressive collection of sealskin kayaks and traditional hunting artifacts. The modest wooden frame of the Nuuk Cathedral, built in 1849, is a recognizable landmark on Nuuk’s skyline.

The site of Nuuk was occupied as far back as 2,200 B.C.E. by ancient pre-Inuit peoples from Canada. It was settled again in the 10th century by Viking explorers. The current city was founded in 1728 by Danish missionary Hans Egede. A statue of Egede stands adjacent to the cathedral.

Day 13: Maniitsoq (Sukkertoppen), Greenland

  • Ship
  • 1 Breakfast, 1 Lunch, 1 Dinner
Maniitsoq means ‘uneven place’ in Greenlandic, referring to the many rocky knolls and small mountains that shape the geography of the town. Greenlanders like to compare their small towns with world-famous cities. Maniitsoq, intersected by small natural canals, has been dubbed the ‘Venice of Greenland’ by the locals. Colorful houses reflected in the calm water, stunning mountain scenes, smiling and friendly people and the occasional Greenlandic sled-dog are just a few of the photographic opportunities in Maniitsoq. 

Nearby, awe-inspiring Eternity Fjord is considered by many to be the most scenic fjord in all of Greenland. Glaciers descending from the high peaks are heavily crevassed, resembling the cracked skin of a giant white elephant. The water is dotted with ice of all sizes, most having broken off of the glaciers as they calved into the sea. This is a grand landscape, remote, secluded and a treasure for those fortunate enough to explore it.

Day 14: Sisimiut (Holsteinsborg), Greenland

  • Ship
  • 1 Breakfast, 1 Lunch, 1 Dinner
Sisimiut, located 24 miles north of the Arctic Circle, is renowned as a rough, real, and remote outdoor adventure-travel hub. With 5,600 inhabitants, it is the second-largest city in Greenland, founded in 1756 by Danish missionary Hans Egede. The name "Sisimiut" means 'place of fox dens' in Greenlandic. The area has a rich history, being inhabited for 4,500 years by various Inuit cultures, with the majority of the current population being descendants of the Thule people.

Set in a picturesque fjord on bare rock outcrops, Sisimiut boasts colorful houses in bright red, yellow, green, and blue, contrasting beautifully with the gray and white landscape. Mount Nasaasaaq, standing tall at 2,572 feet (784 meters), serves as a stunning backdrop to the town. The Sisimiut Museum houses a traditional Greenlandic peat house and the remains of an 18th-century kayak.

Day 15: Kangerlussuaq, Greenland | Reykjavik, Iceland | Disembark

  • 1 Breakfast, 1 Lunch, 1 Dinner
In October 1941, the United States Army Air Force established an airbase at Kangerlussuaq, serving as a refueling stop for military aircraft flying to Britain during World War II. The 170-kilometer-long Kangerlussuaq fjord posed navigation challenges due to frequent fog. Today, the site is the largest commercial airport in Greenland, and modern technology has resolved navigation issues. Additionally, Kangerlussuaq was used for upper atmospheric scientific research, involving the firing of 33 missiles from 1971 to 1987.

Reykjavík, founded by Viking settler Ingólfur Arnarson around 870 C.E, marks the first permanent settlement in Iceland. With about 200,000 residents, it is the country's capital and a sophisticated city, known for its cleanliness, greenness, and safety. Reykjavik offers a rich cultural scene, history, music, shopping, and vibrant nightlife. The iconic Hallgrímskirkja Church and colorful rooftops define the city's skyline. It hosts internationally recognized festivals, including the Iceland Air music festival, Reykjavik Arts Festival, and Reykjavik International Film Festival.


 

Ship/Hotel

Seabourn Venture

The Seabourn Venture Dining Area
The Seabourn Venture Conference Hall
The Seabourn Venture Lounge Area

Dates & Prices

My Preferred Start Date

Per person starting at
$12,599
Veranda Suite at the Seabourn VentureRoom layout of the Veranda suite at the Seabourn VenturePanorama Suite room layout at the Seabourne Venture
Select a Date
Veranda Suite(OB)
Approximate total space: 355 sq. ft. (33 sq. m.) including veranda of 75 sq. ft. (7 sq. m.)* All Veranda Suites onboard Seabourn Venture feature a comfortable living area; private veranda; queen-size bed or two twin beds; walk-in closet; personal safe; interactive TV with music and movies; fully stocked bar and refrigerator; writing desk with personalized stationery; makeup vanity; spacious bathroom, separate tub and shower, plush robes, slippers, luxury health and beauty products, hairdryer and 110/220V AC outlets. *Some veranda sizes vary.
Veranda Suite at the Seabourn VentureRoom layout of the Veranda suite at the Seabourn VentureBathroom at the Veranda Suite at the Seabourn Pursuit
Select a Date
Veranda Suite(V1)
Decks 5, 6; Approximate total space: 355 sq. ft. (33 sq. m.) including veranda of 75 sq. ft. (7 sq. m.)* All Veranda Suites onboard Seabourn Venture feature a comfortable living area; private veranda; queen-size bed or two twin beds; walk-in closet; personal safe; interactive TV with music and movies; fully stocked bar and refrigerator; writing desk with personalized stationery; makeup vanity; spacious bathroom, separate tub and shower, plush robes, slippers, luxury health and beauty products, hairdryer and 110/220V AC outlets. *Some veranda sizes vary.
Veranda Suite at the Seabourn VentureRoom layout of the Veranda suite at the Seabourn VentureBathroom at the Veranda Suite at the Seabourn Pursuit
Select a Date
Veranda Suite(V2)
Decks 5, 6; Approximate total space: 355 sq. ft. (33 sq. m.) including veranda of 75 sq. ft. (7 sq. m.)* All Veranda Suites onboard Seabourn Venture feature a comfortable living area; private veranda; queen-size bed or two twin beds; walk-in closet; personal safe; interactive TV with music and movies; fully stocked bar and refrigerator; writing desk with personalized stationery; makeup vanity; spacious bathroom, separate tub and shower, plush robes, slippers, luxury health and beauty products, hairdryer and 110/220V AC outlets. *Some veranda sizes vary.
Veranda Suite at the Seabourn VentureRoom layout of the Veranda suite at the Seabourn VentureBathroom at the Veranda Suite at the Seabourn Pursuit
Select a Date
Veranda Suite(V3)
Decks 5, 6; Approximate total space: 355 sq. ft. (33 sq. m.) including veranda of 75 sq. ft. (7 sq. m.)* All Veranda Suites onboard Seabourn Venture feature a comfortable living area; private veranda; queen-size bed or two twin beds; walk-in closet; personal safe; interactive TV with music and movies; fully stocked bar and refrigerator; writing desk with personalized stationery; makeup vanity; spacious bathroom, separate tub and shower, plush robes, slippers, luxury health and beauty products, hairdryer and 110/220V AC outlets. *Some veranda sizes vary.
Veranda Suite at the Seabourn VentureRoom layout of the Veranda suite at the Seabourn Venture
Select a Date
Veranda Suite(V4)
Deck 7 Suites 741, 743; Approximate total space: 355 sq. ft. (33 sq. m.) including veranda of 75 sq. ft. (7 sq. m.) All Veranda Spa Suites onboard Seabourn Venture feature a comfortable living area; private veranda; queen-size bed or two twin beds; walk-in closet; personal safe; interactive TV with music and movies; fully stocked bar and refrigerator; writing desk with personalized stationery; makeup vanity; spacious bathroom, separate tub and shower, plush robes, slippers, luxury health and beauty products, hairdryer and 110/220V AC outlets.
Veranda Suite at the Seabourn VentureRoom layout of the Veranda suite at the Seabourn VentureBathroom at the Veranda Suite at the Seabourn Pursuit
Select a Date
Veranda Spa Suite
Deck 7 Suites 741, 743; Approximate total space: 355 sq. ft. (33 sq. m.) including veranda of 75 sq. ft. (7 sq. m.) All Veranda Spa Suites onboard Seabourn Venture feature a comfortable living area; private veranda; queen-size bed or two twin beds; walk-in closet; personal safe; interactive TV with music and movies; fully stocked bar and refrigerator; writing desk with personalized stationery; makeup vanity; spacious bathroom, separate tub and shower, plush robes, slippers, luxury health and beauty products, hairdryer and 110/220V AC outlets.
Panorama Suite at the Seabourne VenturePanorama Suite room layout at the Seabourne Venture
Select a Date
Panorama Veranda Suite
Deck 7 Suites 735, 736; Total space: 1,044 sq. ft. (97 sq. m.) including veranda of 129 sq. ft. (12 sq. m.) All Wintergarden Suites onboard Seabourn Venture feature a comfortable living area; private veranda; queen-size bed or two twin beds; walk-in closet; personal safe; interactive TV with music and movies; fully stocked bar and refrigerator; writing desk with personalized stationery; makeup vanity; spacious bathroom, separate tub and shower, plush robes, slippers, luxury health and beauty products, hairdryer and 110/220V AC outlets.
Seabourne Venture Penthouse SuiteRoom layout of the Penthouse Suite at the Seabourne Venture
Select a Date
Penthouse Suite
Deck 7 Suites 735, 736; Total space: 1,044 sq. ft. (97 sq. m.) including veranda of 129 sq. ft. (12 sq. m.) All Wintergarden Suites onboard Seabourn Venture feature a comfortable living area; private veranda; queen-size bed or two twin beds; walk-in closet; personal safe; interactive TV with music and movies; fully stocked bar and refrigerator; writing desk with personalized stationery; makeup vanity; spacious bathroom, separate tub and shower, plush robes, slippers, luxury health and beauty products, hairdryer and 110/220V AC outlets.
Seabourne Venture Penthouse SuiteRoom layout of the Penthouse Suite at the Seabourne Venture
Select a Date
Penthouse Spa Suite
Deck 7 Suites 735, 736; Total space: 1,044 sq. ft. (97 sq. m.) including veranda of 129 sq. ft. (12 sq. m.) All Wintergarden Suites onboard Seabourn Venture feature a comfortable living area; private veranda; queen-size bed or two twin beds; walk-in closet; personal safe; interactive TV with music and movies; fully stocked bar and refrigerator; writing desk with personalized stationery; makeup vanity; spacious bathroom, separate tub and shower, plush robes, slippers, luxury health and beauty products, hairdryer and 110/220V AC outlets.
Room layout at the Seabourn Venture Owners SuiteRoom layout at the Seabourn Venture Owners SuiteRoom layout at the Seabourn Venture Owners SuiteRoom layout at the Owners suite of the Seabourn Venture
Select a Date
Wintergarden Suite
Deck 7 Suites 735, 736; Total space: 1,044 sq. ft. (97 sq. m.) including veranda of 129 sq. ft. (12 sq. m.) All Wintergarden Suites onboard Seabourn Venture feature a comfortable living area; private veranda; queen-size bed or two twin beds; walk-in closet; personal safe; interactive TV with music and movies; fully stocked bar and refrigerator; writing desk with personalized stationery; makeup vanity; spacious bathroom, separate tub and shower, plush robes, slippers, luxury health and beauty products, hairdryer and 110/220V AC outlets.
Room layout at the Seabourn Venture Owners SuiteRoom layout at the Seabourn Venture Owners SuiteRoom layout at the Seabourn Venture Owners SuiteRoom layout at the Owners suite of the Seabourn Venture
Select a Date
Owners Suite
Deck 7 Suites 700, 701 Total space 1,023 sq. ft. (95 sq. m.) incl. veranda of 484 sq. ft. (45 sq. m.) Owner's Suites on Seabourn Venture feature a comfortable living area; private veranda; queen-size bed or two twin beds; extra-large walk-in closet for expedition gear; personal safe; interactive flat-screen TV with music and movies; fully stocked bar and refrigerator; writing desk with personalized stationery; makeup vanity; spacious bathroom with double vanities, tub and shower, plush robes, slippers, hairdryer and 110/220V AC outlets.
Room layout at the Seabourn Venture Owners SuiteRoom layout at the Seabourn Venture Owners SuiteRoom layout at the Seabourn Venture Owners SuiteRoom layout at the Owners suite of the Seabourn Venture
Select a Date
Signature Suite
All Signature Suites onboard Seabourn Venture feature a comfortable living area; private veranda; queen-size bed or two twin beds; walk-in closet, personal safe; interactive TV with music and movies; fully stocked bar and refrigerator; writing desk with personalized stationery; makeup vanity; spacious bathroom, separate tub and shower, plush robes, slippers, luxury health and beauty products, hairdryer and 110/220V AC outlets.
Room layout at the Seabourn Venture Owners SuiteRoom layout at the Seabourn Venture Owners SuiteRoom layout at the Seabourn Venture Owners SuiteRoom layout at the Owners suite of the Seabourn Venture
Select a Date
Grand Wintergarden Suite
Deck 7 Combine mid-ship Suites 733 and 735 for Suite 7353, or Suites 734 and 736 for Suite 7364 Total space: 1,399 sq. ft. (130 sq. m.) including two verandas totaling 205 sq. ft. (19 sq. m.) All Grand Wintergarden Suites onboard Seabourn Venture feature a comfortable living area; private veranda; queen-size bed or two twin beds; walk-in closet; personal safe; interactive TV with music and movies; fully stocked bar and refrigerator; writing desk with personalized stationery; makeup vanity; spacious bathroom, separate tub and shower, plush robes, slippers, luxury health and beauty products, hairdryer and 110/220V AC outlets.
Included
  • 14 Breakfasts, 14 Lunches, 15 Dinners
  • 14 Nights Accommodations
  • Accommodations as listed
  • Ground transportation as listed
  • Activities as listed
  • Meals as listed
  • Access to a 24-7 Emergency line while traveling
  • Unlimited Wifi
  • Complimentary fine wines at lunch and dinner, and open bars throughout the ship
  • In-suite bar and refrigerator stocked with your preferences
  • All dining venues are complimentary
  • Personal Suite Host and Suite Attendant 
  • Marina and complimentary watersports
Excluded
  • Gratuities
  • Travel Insurance
  • Personal Expenses
  • Flight costs (please request a quote)
  • Additional excursions during free time
  • Fuel and transportation surcharges (when applicable)
  • Medical and Evacuation insurance coverage.
  • Excursions

Map

When to Go

Jan
Feb
Mar
Apr
May
Jun
Jul
Aug
Sep
Oct
Nov
Dec
Good to ideal period to travel, and many people choose to visit at this time.

Inquire

* By providing your phone number, you consent to receive direct phone calls or SMS messages from our Trip Planners to get the process started. We do not share your information with third-parties.
Travel Agents

We Love to Talk Travel

Call 1.800.344.6118
or
Chat Now
Beyond expectations! Then again we weren't sure what to expect. Lovely stay at the lodge, met other like-minded travelers (many had their trips planned by Adventure Life) and the owner was a gracious hostess. It felt like you were one happy family, visiting with a favorite aunt.
Nancy Sin

Arctic Travel Guide

Favorite Arctic All Trips

More Reasons

Why Travel With Adventure Life

All News

Recognized By