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Belfast City Hall and Ferris Wheel

Hamburg to London (Greenwich)

Example 15 Day Cruise aboard Silver Whisper
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This two-week cruise shows a side of the British Isles that is more often kept for locals. Beginning in Hamburg, Germany’s capital of cool, let Silver Whisper whisk you away to the Land of the Brave – aka Scotland. After exploring the lovely city of Edinburgh, it’s on to the islands for an immersion in Celtic culture and countryside. Across the Irish sea to Belfast and Dublin, before it’s back to the UK and the home of the Fab Four. Wales, Cornwall and London complete your trip.

Day-by-Day Summary

Day 1 : Hamburg, Germany | Embark
Day 2 : Hamburg
Day 3 : At Sea
Days 4-5 : Edinburgh
Day 6 : Kirkwall, Orkney Islands
Day 7 : Lerwick, Shetland Islands
Day 8 : Stornoway (Isle of Lewis)
Day 9 : Belfast
Day 10 : Liverpool
Day 11 : Dublin
Day 12 : Fishguard, Wales
Day 13 : Falmouth
Day 14 : At Sea
Day 15 : London (Greenwich) | Disembark

Highlights

  • Visit the 'Venice of the North', Hamburg
  • Discover the splendor of Scotland while touring Edinburgh
  • Explore the state-of-the-art Titanic Museum in modern Belfast
  • Experience the architecture, traditions and flavors of Dublin

Ship

Silver Whisper

Places Visited

Activities

Trip Type

  • Small Ship

Activity Level

Relaxed

Trip Snapshots

Belfast City Hall and Ferris Wheel Learn about the history of Liverpool Ha'penny Bridge in Dublin The sprawling city of Hamburg Discover the rich history of Edinburgh Springtime in London
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Day 1 Hamburg, Germany | Embark

Embark on the Silver Whisper to start your journey across the British Isles.

Day 2 Hamburg

  • Ship
  • 1 Breakfast, 1 Lunch, 1 Dinner
A true city of water, effortlessly cool Hamburg is an outward-looking city, with a unique flow of its own. Nestled snugly between the Baltic and North seas, Germany's second-biggest city is intersected by a frayed network of rivers and canals, spanned by hundreds of pretty bridges. The comparisons are obvious - but Hamburg's reputation as the 'Venice of the North' is a little wide of the mark. This quirky, heritage-filled city has a distinct character and open outlook all of its own, and continues to relish its role as Germany's gateway to the world. The water brought Hamburg its wealth, and vast redbrick warehouses stack up against the waterfront in the Speicherstadt district - now a UNESCO World Heritage Site. They linger from the era when the city was a Hanseatic League trading capital and the warehouses essentially formed a city unto themselves, with goods brought and exchanged from distant shores. Elsewhere, the Reeperbahn is a notorious and unabashed street of nocturnal mischief, with shifty neon-lit nightclubs, in amongst the city's famous red-light district. Hamburg has a much more wholesome side too, however, and is a powerhouse of museums, theatre and culture. It’s littered with over 100 music venues and the city played a crucial role in The Beatles’ early story.

Day 3 At Sea

  • Ship
  • 1 Breakfast, 1 Lunch, 1 Dinner
Days at sea are the perfect opportunity to relax, unwind and catch up with what you’ve been meaning to do. So whether that is going to the gym, visiting the spa, whale watching, catching up on your reading or simply topping up your tan, these blue sea days are the perfect balance to busy days spent exploring shore side.

Day 4-5 Edinburgh

  • Ship
  • 2 Breakfasts, 2 Lunches, 2 Dinners
Edinburgh is to London as poetry is to prose, as Charlotte Brontë once wrote. One of the world's stateliest cities and proudest capitals, it's built—like Rome—on seven hills, making it a striking backdrop for the ancient pageant of history. In a skyline of sheer drama, Edinburgh Castle watches over the capital city, frowning down on Princes Street’s glamour and glitz. But despite its rich past, the city’s famous festivals, excellent museums and galleries, as well as the modern Scottish Parliament, are reminders that Edinburgh has its feet firmly in the 21st century.Nearly everywhere in Edinburgh (the burgh is always pronounced burra in Scotland) there are spectacular buildings, whose Doric, Ionic, and Corinthian pillars add touches of neoclassical grandeur to the largely Presbyterian backdrop. Large gardens are a strong feature of central Edinburgh, where the city council is one of the most stridently conservationist in Europe. Arthur's Seat, a mountain of bright green and yellow furze, rears up behind the spires of the Old Town. This child-size mountain jutting 822 feet above its surroundings has steep slopes and little crags, like a miniature Highlands set down in the middle of the busy city.

Day 6 Kirkwall, Orkney Islands

  • Ship
  • 1 Breakfast, 1 Lunch, 1 Dinner
Scattered just off the northern tip of Scotland, Kirkwall is the capital of the Orkney Islands - a scenic archipelago of fascinating, dual heritage. The Viking influence is deep, while a prehistoric past and World War history adds to the endless stories that these dramatic islands have to tell. Sparse and beautiful, let the sweeping seascapes of frothing waves, and dance of the northern lights, enchant you as you explore. Windswept beaches are inhabited by whooping swans, while grassy cliffs hide puffins amid their wavy embrace. Sea caves and crumbling castles - and the dramatic meeting of the North Sea and the Atlantic Ocean add to the romantic beauty of these lands, which may be physically close to the UK, but feel an entire world away. The sandstone St. Magnus Cathedral is the centrepiece of Orkney's main town - a place of winding lanes and atmospheric walks - and Britain's northernmost cathedral is a masterpiece that took 300 years to complete. Started in 1137, the beautiful cathedral is adorned with mesmerising stain-glass windows and has been evocatively named as the Light of the North.

Day 7 Lerwick, Shetland Islands

  • Ship
  • 1 Breakfast, 1 Lunch, 1 Dinner
Adrift between the Scottish and Norwegian coasts, the craggy Shetland Islands form the most northerly point of the British Isles. Sprawling across 100 islands, connected by sandy bridges and crisscrossing ferries, explore the highlights of this scenic archipelago outpost. With incredible Neolithic history, spanning 5,000 years of human heritage, these islands, which sit just shy of the Arctic Circle, are an isolated and immense treasure trove of history and thrilling scenery. Look out over dramatic coastline from atmospheric Iron Age towers. Sweeping, windswept beaches and wisps of sand connect islands and rugged cliffs - stand back as the sounds of the waves smashing against the shore and calling gulls fills the air. The islands are also home to some of the most adorable four-legged creatures you’ll ever meet, the diminutive and wavy-fringed, Shetland Ponies who roam the hills and reach a maximum size of 42 inches. Don't be fooled, though, they are amongst the strongest and toughest of all breeds. Their existence here points to Viking history, as local horses bred with ponies brought ashore by Norse settlers, creating the lovable crossbreed that is an icon of these islands today.

The towering Broch of Mousa is perhaps Europe’s best-preserved Iron Age building - and one of the Shetland's finest brochs - a series of round, stone towers, believed to have been constructed around 100 BC. Seals and birdlife ensure that the isolated islands are always well-populated with life - and you can embark on hikes to discover their coastal homes. Lerwick is the islands’ capital, and there's a charming welcome on offer, as you arrive before the waterfront of stone buildings, which cascade down to the shore.

Day 8 Stornoway (Isle of Lewis)

  • Ship
  • 1 Breakfast, 1 Lunch, 1 Dinner
Scotland's Outer Hebrides can be rainy, remote and cold – yet their inhabitants rank as the happiest people in the UK. What is their secret? One trip to the lovely port of Stornoway and you’ll soon understand why. Like something on the front of a chocolate box, Stornoway is almost a cliché of everything that is lovely about remotest Scotland: buttercups glowing at the side of single track roads, wisps of bog cotton swaying in the breeze, heather was blooming on the swathes of moorland that cover the interior of the islands, dramatic, romantic landscapes as far as the eye can see … But far from being just beautiful – the mountains, hills, lunar-like rocky plateaus, moorlands, meadows, rugged coastlines and white sandy beaches not to be undermined - Stornoway is full of history, culture and unsurprisingly, more wildlife that you can shake a stick at. Set on the eastern coast of the Isle of Lewis and the Isle of Harris, Stornaway is the capital of the Outer Hebrides, and the jumping off point for all those who want to venture even further north. Although it may sound like two separate islands, Lewis and Harris are actually two parts of the one island, and as such, is full of interesting things to do while you are here. Historians will certainly want to start with the truly magical 5,000 year old Callanish Stones. Scotland’s answer to Stonehenge, these impressive stones are actually part of a cluster of several different archaeological sites in this area.

Day 9 Belfast

  • Ship
  • 1 Breakfast, 1 Lunch, 1 Dinner
Reborn as a cool, modern city, Belfast has successfully left its troubles behind, emerging as a hotbed of culture and architecture, where the comfort of a cosy pub is never far away. Take a voyage of discovery in its maritime quarter, home to a celebrated museum dedicated to the most famous ship ever built, which was constructed right here in the city’s shipyards. A walk across the Lagan Weir Footbridge brings you to Belfast’s fascinating Titanic District – an area of the city devoted to its rich ship-building heritage. The state-of-the-art Titanic Museum brings the story of the doomed vessel to life, and is the largest museum dedicated to the infamously ‘unsinkable’ ship. Wind up a nautical-themed ramble along the Maritime Mile with a visit to SS Nomadic, the smaller cousin of the Titanic, and a ship which serves as a fascinating time capsule back to the pomp and grandeur of the Titanic, while also telling its own stories of service in both World Wars. There’s just enough time to give the 10-metre long Salmon of Knowledge sculpture a quick peck for luck, before continuing to explore. A stark barbed wire and graffitied sheet metal barrier marks an abrupt scar through the city’s residential areas. The Peace Line was constructed during the height of the Troubles, when Belfast was plagued by sectarian divisions between Protestants and Catholics.

Day 10 Liverpool

  • Ship
  • 1 Breakfast, 1 Lunch, 1 Dinner
Who can say Liverpool without thinking of The Beatles? Home to the fab four, Penny Lane, Strawberry Fields and the Cavern Club, this northern English city is undoubtedly one of the most important places on the 20th-century music scene. Even UNESCO agrees - Liverpool became a City of Music (one of only 19 in the world) in 2015. So understandably, it’s bursting with pride. Not only for its most famous former residents but also its football team, its maritime heritage and its thriving cultural scene (it was Capital of Culture in 2008). A huge regeneration project over the past two decades has seen Liverpool blossom from being a below-par northern English city to a somewhere buzzing with charm. The arrival of the Tate Liverpool paved the way – quickly followed by the restoration of some 2,500 plus listed buildings (that’s more than any English city outside London). The waterfront revitalisation came next with bars, clubs, galleries and independent boutiques, giving Liverpool some of the best dining and shopping there is. Don’t leave here without tasting Scouse – a traditional beef stew – and from where Liverpudlians draw their nickname “Scousers”. Culturally speaking, Liverpool is “bang on” as Scousers would say. The three Graces (named after the Greek goddesses of charm, beauty and creativity) line the waterfront and are responsible in part for Liverpool’s second UNESCO gong as a World Heritage Site. Further afield, the lovely parks and Crosby Beach offer a welcome respite from the urban hub.

Day 11 Dublin

  • Ship
  • 1 Breakfast, 1 Lunch, 1 Dinner
Atmospheric cobbled streets, with buskers scraping fiddles and characterful pubs inviting passersby inside, is Dublin in a snapshot. A city of irrepressible energy and lust for life, Ireland's capital is as welcoming a place as you'll find. Horse-drawn carriages plod along cobbled centuries-old streets, blending with an easy-going, cosmopolitan outlook. Known for its fun-filled gathering of pubs, any excuse works to enjoy a celebratory toast and chat among good company. Home to perhaps the world's most famous beer - slurp perfect pourings of thick, dark Guinness - cranked out for the city's thirsty punters. Learn more of the humble pint's journey at the Guinness Storehouse. Dublin has come along way since the Vikings established a trading port here, back in the 9th Century. In the time since, the city became the British Empire's defacto second city, and the Georgian imprint still adds oodles of historic character. Learn of 1916's Easter Uprising, when the Irish rebelled and established their independence here, as you visit the infamous, haunting Kilmainham Gaol. The uprising's leaders were tried and executed in these dark confines. Dublin's St. Patrick's Cathedral has immense history below its steep spire, which dates back to 1191. There's rich literary heritage to leaf through too, and the city's streets were rendered vividly in James Joyce's classic Ullyses. The Museum of Literature celebrates the full scope of Dublin's lyrical talents. Trinity College also has a prestigious roll-call of alumni - visit to see the Book of Kells, a beautifully illustrated bible of the medieval era.

Day 12 Fishguard, Wales

  • Ship
  • 1 Breakfast, 1 Lunch, 1 Dinner
Perched on a clifftop and stunningly picturesque, Fishguard is considered the very heart of North Pembrokeshire. A small market town that almost seems untouched by time, you’ll find clusters of quayside cottages, family businesses selling local produce and plenty of Gaelic charm! Market day falls on a Saturday and although principally food, there are some stalls selling local arts and crafts too. If you are not lucky enough to be visiting on market day, the pretty high street has some lovely shops where you can easily while away a couple of hours. Known internationally as the place of the last invasion of Britain when the French landed in 1797, the village heaves with history. Historians will of course already know that the two-day invasion soon failed and the peace treaty was signed in the Royal Oak pub in the market square. Over 200 years later the pub still stands and is perhaps one of the best places to soak up the local charm! The real stars of the show here however are the lovely surroundings. The calm waters are perfect for kayaking while walkers will love the national parks that are filled with signposted trails for all levels of ability. Cyclist of all levels will also be pleased; Fishguard and its surroundings do have a few hills, but also lots of straight roads that offer a gentle visit of the stunning landscape.

Day 13 Falmouth

  • Ship
  • 1 Breakfast, 1 Lunch, 1 Dinner
England’s Cornish coast is often touted as being one of the loveliest on earth, and Falmouth is testament to that. A lovely jumble of traditional seaside charm, long stretches of sandy beach and quintessential Britishness, Falmouth offers much in the way of entertainment. Think bags of style, a community spirit and a modern, arty, edge, and you have just about summed Falmouth up. It was recently voted as the UK’s best town to live, so it must be doing something right! With Falmouth, appearances can be deceptive – while one might think it is a twee seaside village that owes its livelihood to tourism, it is actually a university town, full of art galleries, independent book shops and of course buzzing bars and restaurants. Get a taste of the student life by wandering the seafront and the Prince of Wales Pier, ice-cream in hand. While the town might have embraced its future, its past is still very relevant. A major port in the 18-century the National Maritime Museum has a great deal of history on offer. For those who want to stretch their legs further afield and really enjoy the glorious English countryside, why not indulge your senses with a coastal trek along the Lizard Peninsula. Beautifully bordered by sea and open landscapes, expect to see tiny fishing villages hidden in their coves, dramatic coastal landscapes and even the Lizard Lighthouse, one of Marconi’s experimental wireless stations. Don’t forget to get yourself a cream tea – a Cornish institution – to congratulate yourself at the end!

Day 14 At Sea

  • Ship
  • 1 Breakfast, 1 Lunch, 1 Dinner
Days at sea are the perfect opportunity to relax, unwind and catch up with what you’ve been meaning to do. So whether that is going to the gym, visiting the spa, whale watching, catching up on your reading or simply topping up your tan, these blue sea days are the perfect balance to busy days spent exploring shore side.

Day 15 London (Greenwich) | Disembark

  • 1 Breakfast
Set your watches for Greenwich, a Royal borough of London, that is literally located at the center of the world - dissected as it is by the Meridian Line. The line neatly splits the globe in half and marks zero degrees on the map. Enjoy a stroll past the glittering lake and sniffing deer of leafy Greenwich Park, or settle for a quiet drink in a charming riverside pub as you enjoy London's quieter side, and the spiritual home of science and seafaring history. Britain has extraordinary heritage on the waves, and you can learn more of the era when Britannia ruled the waves at the National Maritime Museum. Another piece of maritime history has been raised out of the water, and proudly displayed here for all to enjoy in Greenwich. The Cutty Sark was one of the fastest clipper ships ever built, and you can climb aboard to steer the wheel of this spectacular, living piece of maritime history, which is now housed on the banks of the Thames. The celebrated Royal Observatory is a revered font of knowledge, which has been observing, studying and measuring the sea and stars since 1675. Divided by the Meridian Line, you can step between continents, as you explore this global centre of learning and science, which is the home of Greenwich Mean Time.
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Medallion Suite
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Silver Suite
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Royal Suite
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Grand Suite
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Owner's Suite
Twin beds or queen-sized bed; Two-bedroom has additional twin beds or queen-sized bed. Large teak veranda and a separate dining area and bar.

Notes

Expedition highlights and wildlife listed here are possible experiences only and cannot be guaranteed. Your expedition leader and captain will work together to ensure opportunities for adventure and exploration are the best possible, taking into account the prevailing weather and wildlife activity. Expedition team members scheduled for this voyage are subject to change or cancellation.

Included in cruise fare:
  • 1 Shore Excursion per port, per day
  • Spacious suites – over 80% with private verandas
  • Butler service in every suite
  • Unlimited Free Wifi
  • Personalised service – nearly one crew member for every guest
  • Multiple restaurants, diverse cuisine, open-seating dining
  • Beverages in-suite and throughout the ship, including champagne, select wines and spirits
  • 24-hour dining service
  • Onboard entertainment
  • Complimentary transportation into town in most ports
  • Onboard gratuities
Not included in cruise fare:
  • Airfare
  • Hotel accommodations
  • Transfers and luggage handling
  • Optional shore excursions
  • Meals ashore
  • Fuel surcharges
  • Accommodations while ashore
  • Casino gaming, laundry, or valet services
  • Purchases from the ship boutiques or any item or service of a personal nature such as medical care, massages, spa treatments, private fitness instruction, hair styling and manicures
  • Some champagne, premium wine and spirit selections, caviar, cigarettes and cigars are not included in your fare and may not be available at all times.
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